Michael Pool

Michael Pool

I received my Ph.D. in anthropological archaeology in 2002 from the University of Texas at Austin. I have worked in Texas, Tennessee, Oklahoma, Arizona, and New Mexico. My primary interest is in the American Southwest, especially the Mogollon Culture. My primary research interest is in prehistoric agriculture and the diffusion of maize into the Southwest. My geography graduate classes include GIS, which I have used extensively in my dissertation and subsequent research. For the last 25-30 years I have focused on teaching and presenting papers and posters at the Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology.

I teach all the introductory anthropology classes at ACC, as well as physical and world regional geography.  My interest in world regional geography is based on examining the historical, physical and cultural factors that combine to produce the separate regions of the world. I find this subject especially useful in considering present day events.

Recent publications include:
2013 Michael D. Pool. How Far Is Too Far? An Examination of the Mogollon Early Pithouse Period Settlement System . In Collected Papers from the 17th Biennial Mogollon Archaeology Conference (edited by Lonnie C. Ludeman) pp. 83-94. Las Cruces: Lonnie C. Ludeman

2013 Michael D. Pool. Mimbres Mogollon Farming: Estimating Prehistoric Agricultural Production during the Mimbres Classic Period . In Soils, Climate, & Society: Archaeological Investigations in Ancient America. (edited by John Wingard and Sue Ellen Hayes) pp. 85-108. Boulder: University Press of Colorado.