Designing Purposeful Engagement

Fall 2016 Workshop Series

Click titles to expand the toggles below to learn more about our Fall professional development offerings!

Powerful Classrooms: It All Begins with the Hook

“People learn best when information is presented in a context relevant to them. Learning should include authenticity that is related to their lives, work, or chosen educational pathways.” – (Center for Community College Student Engagement, 2013)
In this workshop, participants will get hands-on with practical strategies for implementing “hooks” in the classroom. Participants are also encouraged to share and engage in discussions about how to apply “hooks” in content specific disciplines. The conversation will foster new ideas and strategies all faculty can take back to their classroom.
A participant in this workshop will walk away with:

– a deeper understanding of learner-centered psychological principles

– practical strategies and a wealth of resources for implementing hooks

– feedback for continuous improvement
Chelsea Biggerstaff is a seasoned education professional. After visiting classrooms in Japan, China, the United States and the Navajo Nation during her undergraduate career at Indiana University, she found the disparity in educational settings inexcusable. She devoted the next 6 years teaching and developing professional development programs for Independent School Districts and local businesses. Chelsea’s background in education and passion drew her to Austin Community College. Currently, Chelsea is a Faculty Development Coordinator where she is using her creativity, educational background, and positive spirit to inspire and learn from the hardworking faculty at ACC.

Calendar Dates

 

Powerful Classrooms: It All Begins with the Hook

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Making Learning Fun: Creating Lessons Using Game Design Techniques

Can we make learning as engaging and addictive as a good game? Jeff Johannigman, former computer game designer, will share techniques of professional game design and ways to apply them to both online and classroom learning.

Participants will gain a deeper understanding of the tools and techniques that game designers use to create engagement, and ideas for applying them to learning design, including:

  • Working definitions of “fun” and “games”
  • The best approach to getting started in game design
  • The twelve essential ingredients for creating an engaging, addictive game

Jeff Johannigman brings extensive experience from the high-tech, non-profit, and government sectors to his role as Faculty Development Coordinator. In his varied career, Jeff has established one of the first alumni career service programs for the University of Texas; managed worldwide staffing for the Tivoli division of IBM; and founded People Type Consulting, providing coaching and assessment to clients seeking new careers. He has served as a Human Dynamics Trainer for the Texas Workforce Commission, where he taught leadership, communications, teamwork, creative problem solving, process improvement, and other professional skills to thousands of state employees. As a former computer game designer and producer, he is now a recognized expert in using game design techniques to make learning more engaging and interactive. Jeff has earned a Bachelor of Science in Computer Science from Cornell University and a Master of Arts in Human Services from St. Edward’s University.

learning_fun

Making Learning Fun: Creating Lessons Using Game Design Techniques

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Using the 5 Languages of Appreciation to Strengthen Engagement

Discover secrets to tapping into your students motivation in the classroom. Through the lens of the languages of appreciation and motivational theory, we will examine strategies and techniques that can be used in and out of the classroom to enhance engagement and success.

Participants will be able to:

  • understand the core concepts of appreciation and encouragement
  • identify the negative results that can occur when students and/or colleagues do not feel valued or appreciated
  • describe the 5 languages of appreciation and what they look like in daily life
  • affirm the core components for appreciation to be communicated effectively (individualized, personal, and in the language meaningful to the recipient)
  • Apply the principles of the languages of appreciation in and out of the classroom

Chelsea Biggerstaff is a seasoned education professional. After visiting classrooms in Japan, China, the United States and the Navajo Nation during her undergraduate career at Indiana University, she found the disparity in educational settings inexcusable. She devoted the next 6 years teaching and developing professional development programs for Independent School Districts and local businesses. Chelsea’s background in education and passion drew her to Austin Community College. Currently, Chelsea is a Faculty Development Coordinator where she is using her creativity, educational background, and positive spirit to inspire and learn from the hardworking faculty at ACC.
Jeff Johannigman brings extensive experience from the high-tech, non-profit, and government sectors to his role as Faculty Development Coordinator. In his varied career, Jeff has established one of the first alumni career service programs for the University of Texas; managed worldwide staffing for the Tivoli division of IBM; and founded People Type Consulting, providing coaching and assessment to clients seeking new careers. He has served as a Human Dynamics Trainer for the Texas Workforce Commission, where he taught leadership, communications, teamwork, creative problem solving, process improvement, and other professional skills to thousands of state employees.available.

 

Using the 5 Languages of Appreciation to Strengthen Engagement

To Be Determined

Archived Series

Fall 2015 Workshop Series

PROCESS, NOT PRODUCT: INSTRUCTIONAL APPROACHES THAT ENHANCE SUCCESS

Click to RegisterOct 16th, 2015: 9 am – 11:30 am
Northridge Campus (NRG) 4266

Enhance you and your student’s success by experiencing four instructional approaches used in an art class. Each participant, by drawing a charcoal and pencil self-portrait from a photograph, will come to understand how to remove the barriers to satisfaction and self-efficacy. The creation of the drawing would provide the basic structure for the use and discussion of instructional approaches used by presenter David Thornberry in his drawing classes to help non-art major students past conceptual barriers. The teaching ideas, applicable to any discipline, are: 1. It’s not about talent. 2. Process, not product. 3. General to specific. 4. Getting past negative self-definition; add the word “yet”. All drawing tools would be provided by the presenter/workshop. The photograph for drawing to be taken on-site in order to control lighting for easier drawing.

Participants will:

  1. Understand how art principles applied to instruction strengthen the classroom
  2. Experience a new “process-oriented” approach to instruction
  3. Improve self-efficacy and barriers to you and your students’ success

David Thornberry is an Art Instructor and Poet. He has an MFA in Painting from Kent State University. He currently teaches drawing with Austin Community College.

EMPOWERING CLASSROOM SUCCESS THROUGH POWERFUL STORYTELLING

Click to RegisterNovember 6th, 2015, 9:00-11:00 am
Highland Campus (HLC) 1101

Storytelling is the oldest and most powerful way to communicate information. It is an art form that inspires, transforms and paints indelible pictures in the minds of listeners. As an instructional tool it can be used to help retention of both information and student as stories captivate, entertain and immerse us in an experience.  We can also fortify students’ communication skill set by allowing them to tell their own carefully crafted story. In particular, telling their success story can improve self-efficacy, be a powerful motivator, and provide a connecting agent for students in your class.  This workshop teaches how to strengthen your own stories as well as those of your students, and demonstrates innovative, contemporary ways to use storytelling as a connecting, engaging tool in the classroom.

Participants will:

  1. Learn the essentials elements of a great story
  2. Discover techniques gifted storytellers use
  3. Explore storytelling modalities for the classroom as well as Ideas for integrating student storytelling into existing curricula.
  4. Find out the value and applications of the success story as an assignment
  5. Incorporate the essential elements of strong storytelling via a group project

Participants are encouraged to bring a story idea to the workshop involving a challenge they had that evolved into a success. This workshop is co-presented by Mark Butland and Merrilee Shopland.

Mark Butland is Professor of Communication at Austin Community College. He’s also a researcher and author as well as a professional speaker and corporate trainer. With over 20 years teaching experience, Mark has been the recipient of several teaching excellence awards. Mark’s Textbooks, “Public Speaking: Choices for Effective Results,” 6th Ed. and “Achieving Communication Competence,” 2nd Ed. are widely used. Mark’s academic research and publishing is in the area of instructional communication. Mark’s workshops on presentation skills, effective meetings, and using the elevator speech effectively, have been well received at Dell, Motorola, 3M, National Instruments, Tyson Foods, Texas Gas Services, Austin Chamber of Commerce, and others. He is a member of ASTD and NSA. Mark lives in Austin Texas with his Wife, Natalie, and his son, Christopher.

Merrilee Shopland brings over 25 years of experience working at ACC in both Professional Development and as an Adjunct Faculty Professor.  Currently she serves as the Faculty Development Coordinator in ACC’s Faculty Development Office utilizing her background in multimedia, training and development and instructional design. She has presented nationally in the areas of presentations skills, instructional software, teaching strategies, and fostering creativity in the classroom. She studied at the Center for Digital Storytelling in California and taught filmmaking with UT Informal Classes for 15 years.

CREATING A MORE DYNAMIC CLASSROOM USING DIGITAL STORYTELLING

Click to RegisterDec. 4th, 9:00 – 11:30 am
Highland Business Center (HBC) 103.6

Storytelling has always been a significant part of history, but the means of telling stories has evolved. From oral histories, to the works of scribes, to newspapers, CNN, and now the Internet, stories have been a critical tool for transmitting information. Digital media now combines tradition with technology and allows students and instructors to tell stories through voice, text, images, audio, and video. It encourages students to communicate, collaborate, and research, as well as to infuse media into the process.  Bringing contemporary communication tools combined with the ancient art of storytelling into your curricula will add a multi-dimensional vitality to your classroom.

In this workshop, participants will:

  • Learn why digital stories are a vital part of today’s classroom
  • Discover the digital storytelling process
  • Explore several tools used to create digital stories
  • Create a digital story

Merrilee Shopland brings over 25 years of experience working at ACC in both Professional Development and as an Adjunct Faculty Professor.  Currently she serves as the Faculty Development Coordinator in ACC’s Faculty Development Office utilizing her background in multimedia, training and development and instructional design. She has presented nationally in the areas of presentations skills, instructional software, teaching strategies, and fostering creativity in the classroom. She studied at the Center for Digital Storytelling in California and taught filmmaking with UT Informal Classes for 15 years.

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