Careers

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Studying Marketing or Fashion Marketing can be rewarding and open doors to many different career options.

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Marketing Careers

There are many rewarding and interesting jobs in marketing. Marketing can lead to many career paths. Some career choices you can pursue with an associate or a degree in marketing are: Advertising, Customer Service, E-Marketing, Logistics and Distribution, Manufacturer Sales Representative, Market Research, Merchandising, Product Management, Public Relations, Retailing, Sales, Small Business, Store Ownership and Management, Wholesaling.

May 2014 Occupational Employment and Wage Estimates - Austin-Round Rock-San Marcos, TX

Occupation codeOccupation titleMedian hourly wageMean hourly wageAnnual mean wageMean wage RSEEmployment Employment RSELocation quotient
11-2011Advertising and Promotions Managers$41.04$42.89$89,2109.5%21032.7%1.11
41-3011Advertising Sales Agents$27.01$28.16$58,5704.7%83015.8%0.82
11-2021Marketing Managers$67.12$68.82$143,1503.7%1,4308.5%1.18
11-2022Sales Managers$65.97$72.32$150,4202.9%1,8706.6%0.80
11-2031Public Relations and Fundraising Managers$52.25$55.25$114,9303.1%49010.7%1.30
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics
  • SOC Code Number: the Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) system's unique, six-digit (plus hyphen) numerical identifier for each occupation. When the SOC code is a link, clicking on it leads to a page that contains the occupational definition and national cross-industry estimates.
  • Occupation Title: a descriptive title that corresponds to the SOC code.
  • Median Hourly Wage: the estimated 50th percentile of the distribution of wages based on data collected from employers in all industries; 50 percent of workers in an occupation earn less than the median wage, and 50 percent earn more than the median wage.
  • Mean Hourly Wage: the estimated total hourly wages of an occupation divided by its estimated employment, i.e., the average hourly wage.
  • Mean Annual Wage: the estimated total annual wages of an occupation divided by its estimated employment, i.e., the average annual wage.
  • Mean RSE: the relative standard error of the mean wage estimates, a measure of the reliability or precision of the mean wage estimates. The relative standard error is defined as the ratio of the standard error to the survey estimate. For example, a relative standard error of 10 percent implies that the standard error is one-tenth as large as the survey estimate.
  • Employment: the estimated total occupational employment (not including self-employed).
  • Employment RSE: the Relative Standard Error of the employment estimate, a measure of the reliability or precision of the employment estimate. The relative standard error is defined as the ratio of the standard error to the survey estimate. For example, a relative standard error of 10 percent implies that the standard error is one-tenth as large as the survey estimate.
  • Location Quotient: (State, metropolitan, and nonmetropolitan statistical area estimates only) the ratio of an occupation's share of employment in a given area to that occupation's share of employment in the U.S. as a whole. For example, an occupation that makes up 10 percent of employment in a specific metropolitan area compared with 2 percent of U.S. employment would have a location quotient of 5 for the area in question.

About May 2014 National, State, Metropolitan, and Nonmetropolitan Area Occupational Employment and Wage Estimates

May 2014 Occupational Employment and Wage Estimates - Texas

Occupation codeOccupation titleMedian hourly wageMean hourly wageAnnual mean wageMean wage RSEEmployment Employment RSELocation quotient
11-2011Advertising and Promotions Managers$42.11$48.10$100,0503.2%1,1808.2%0.48
41-3011Advertising Sales Agents$21.69$25.74$53,530 2.4%8,1605.0%0.64
11-2021Marketing Managers$64.79$67.63$140,6801.2%9,5603.1%0.62
11-2022Sales Managers$59.72$65.91$137,0900.9%22,4702.5%0.75
11-2031Public Relations and Fundraising Managers$53.25$58.33$121,3201.8%3,1604.6%0.67
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics
  • SOC Code Number: the Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) system's unique, six-digit (plus hyphen) numerical identifier for each occupation. When the SOC code is a link, clicking on it leads to a page that contains the occupational definition and national cross-industry estimates.
  • Occupation Title: a descriptive title that corresponds to the SOC code.
  • Median Hourly Wage: the estimated 50th percentile of the distribution of wages based on data collected from employers in all industries; 50 percent of workers in an occupation earn less than the median wage, and 50 percent earn more than the median wage.
  • Mean Hourly Wage: the estimated total hourly wages of an occupation divided by its estimated employment, i.e., the average hourly wage.
  • Mean Annual Wage: the estimated total annual wages of an occupation divided by its estimated employment, i.e., the average annual wage.
  • Mean RSE: the relative standard error of the mean wage estimates, a measure of the reliability or precision of the mean wage estimates. The relative standard error is defined as the ratio of the standard error to the survey estimate. For example, a relative standard error of 10 percent implies that the standard error is one-tenth as large as the survey estimate.
  • Employment: the estimated total occupational employment (not including self-employed).
  • Employment RSE: the Relative Standard Error of the employment estimate, a measure of the reliability or precision of the employment estimate. The relative standard error is defined as the ratio of the standard error to the survey estimate. For example, a relative standard error of 10 percent implies that the standard error is one-tenth as large as the survey estimate.
  • Location Quotient: (State, metropolitan, and nonmetropolitan statistical area estimates only) the ratio of an occupation's share of employment in a given area to that occupation's share of employment in the U.S. as a whole. For example, an occupation that makes up 10 percent of employment in a specific metropolitan area compared with 2 percent of U.S. employment would have a location quotient of 5 for the area in question.

About May 2014 National, State, Metropolitan, and Nonmetropolitan Area Occupational Employment and Wage Estimates

Advertising, Promotions, and Marketing Managers - 2014 Pay, 2014-2024 Job Outlook

Source: Occupational Outlook Handbook - Pay

advertising_promotions_marketingmanagers_paymarketing1_payThe median annual wage for advertising and promotions managers was $96,720 in May 2014. The median wage is the wage at which half the workers in an occupation earned more than that amount and half earned less. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $45,060, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $187,200.

The median annual wage for marketing managers was $127,130 in May 2014. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $65,980, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $187,200.

Most advertising, promotions, and marketing managers work full time. About 2 in 5 advertising and promotions managers worked more than 40 hours per week in 2014.

Source: Occupational Outlook Handbook - Job Outlook

marketing1_joboutlook1Employment of advertising and promotions managers is projected to grow 5 percent from 2014 to 2024, about as fast as the average for all occupations.

Employment of marketing managers is projected to grow 9 percent from 2014 to 2024, faster than the average for all occupations.

Advertising, promotional, and marketing campaigns are expected to continue being essential as organizations seek to maintain and expand their market share. Advertising and promotions managers will be needed to plan, direct, and coordinate advertising and promotional campaigns, as well as to introduce new products into the marketplace.

Newspaper publishers, one of the top-employing industries of advertising and promotions managers, is projected to decline over the projection period. The continued rise of electronic media will result in decreasing demand for print newspapers. However, advertising and promotions managers are expected to see employment growth in other areas, in which they will be needed to manage digital media campaigns, which often target customers through the use of websites, social media, or live chats.

Through the Internet, advertising campaigns can reach a target audience across many platforms. This greater reach can increase the scale of the campaigns that advertising and promotions managers oversee. With better advertising management software, advertising and promotions managers can control these campaigns more easily, increasing their productivity, and thereby limiting the potential employment growth.

Because marketing managers and their departments are important to an organization’s revenue, marketing managers are less likely to be let go than other types of managers. Marketing managers will continue to be in demand as organizations seek to market their products to specific customers and localities.

Job Prospects

Advertising, promotions, and marketing manager positions are highly desirable and are often sought by other managers and experienced professionals. As a result, strong competition is expected for these occupations. With Internet-based advertising becoming more important, advertising managers who can navigate the digital world should have the best prospects.

marketing1_joboutlook2

Advertising Sales Agents - 2014 Pay, 2014-2024 Job Outlook

Source: Occupational Outlook Handbook - Pay

The median annual wage for advertising sales agents was $47,890 in May 2014. The median wage is the wage at which half the workers in an occupation earned more than that amount and half earned less. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $23,050, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $113,120.

In May 2014, the median annual wages for advertising sales agents in the top industries in which they worked were as follows:

Other information services$56,960
Advertising, public relations, and related services54,930
Television broadcasting54,770
Radio broadcasting41,590
Newspaper publishers36,750

 

Performance-based pay, including bonuses and commissions, can make up a large portion of an advertising sales agent’s earnings. Most employers pay some combination of salaries, commissions, and bonuses. Commissions usually are based on individual sales numbers. Bonuses may depend on individual performance, the performance of all sales workers in a group, or the performance of the entire firm.

Most advertising sales agents work full time. About 1 in 4 advertising sales agents worked more than 40 hours a week in 2014. They frequently work irregular hours and on weekends and holidays.

Source: Occupational Outlook Handbook - Job Outlook

Employment of advertising sales agents is projected to decline 3 percent from 2014 to 2024.

Media companies will continue to rely on advertising revenue for profitability, driving growth in the advertising industry as a whole. Employment growth of advertising sales agents will largely follow broader industry trends. For example, newspaper print advertising is expected to decline, but some of this decline will be offset by the sale of digital ads on newspaper websites. Therefore, although employment of advertising sales agents is projected to decline in the newspaper publishers industry, it is not projected to decline as fast as other occupations in that industry.

However, an increasing amount of advertising is expected to be concentrated in digital media, including online video ads, search engine ads, and other digital ads intended for cell phones or tablet-style computers. Digital advertising on the Internet allows companies to directly target potential consumers because websites usually are associated with the types of products that those consumers would like to buy. Digital advertising can be done without an advertising sales agent, possibly dampening growth for this occupation. For example, in some cases it can be done through a software application or search engine program. Therefore, an increase in digital advertising expenditures will not necessarily result in increased demand for advertising sales agents.

Job Prospects

Competition is expected to be strong for jobs as advertising sales agents. Applicants with experience in sales and those with a bachelor’s degree should have the best opportunities.

Sales Managers - 2014 Pay, 2014-2024 Job Outlook

Source: Occupational Outlook Handbook - Pay

The median annual wage for sales managers was $110,660 in May 2014. The median wage is the wage at which half the workers in an occupation earned more than that amount and half earned less. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $53,620, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $187,200.

In May 2014, the median annual wages for sales managers in the top industries in which they worked were as follows:

Finance and insurance$143,190
Professional, scientific, and technical services141,400
Wholesale trade116,260
Manufacturing114,870
Retail trade78,440

 

Compensation methods for sales managers vary significantly with the type of organization and the product sold. Most employers use a combination of salary and commissions or salary plus bonuses. Commissions usually are a percentage of the value of sales, whereas bonuses may depend on individual performance, on the performance of all sales workers in the group or district, or on the organization's performance.

Most sales managers work full time. They often must work additional hours including some evenings and weekends.

Source: Occupational Outlook Handbook - Job Outlook

Employment of sales managers is projected to grow 5 percent from 2014 to 2024, about as fast as the average for all occupations. Employment growth of these managers will depend primarily on growth or contraction in the industries that employ them.

An effective sales team remains crucial for profitability. As the economy grows, organizations will focus on generating new sales and will look to their sales strategy as a way to increase competitiveness.

Growth is expected to be stronger for sales managers in business-to-business sales than in business-to-consumer sales, because the rise of online shopping will reduce the need for sales calls to individual consumers.

Sales workers are some of the most important personnel in an organization. Therefore, sales managers are less likely to be let go than other types of managers, except in the case of organizations that are merging and consolidating.

Offshoring of these workers is also unlikely. Although domestic companies may hire some sales managers in foreign countries, those workers will function largely to support expansion into foreign markets rather than to replace domestic sales managers.

Job Prospects

Strong competition is expected because other managers and highly experienced professionals often seek these jobs.

Public Relations and Fundraising Managers - 2014 Pay, 2014-2024 Job Outlook

Source: Occupational Outlook Handbook - Pay

The median annual wage for public relations and fundraising managers was $101,510 in May 2014. The median wage is the wage at which half the workers in an occupation earned more than that amount and half earned less. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $55,420, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $187,200.

In May 2014, the median annual wages for public relations and fundraising managers in the top industries in which they worked were as follows:

Professional, scientific, and technical services$130,040
Management of companies and enterprises117,410
Educational services; state, local, and private95,280
Religious, grantmaking, civic, professional, and similar organizations93,900
State and local government, excluding education and hospitals84,340

 

Most public relations and fundraising managers work full time, which often includes long hours. About 1 in 3 managers worked more than 40 hours per week in 2014.

Source: Occupational Outlook Handbook - Job Outlook

Employment of public relations and fundraising managers is projected to grow 7 percent from 2014 to 2024, about as fast as the average for all occupations.

As online social media increases the speed at which news travels, public relations managers will be needed to address good and bad news for their organization or client.

Organizations continue to emphasize community outreach and customer relations as a way to enhance their reputation and visibility. Public opinion can change quickly, particularly as news spreads rapidly through the Internet. Consequently, public relations managers will be needed to coordinate and help respond to news developments in order to maintain their organization’s reputation.

Fundraising managers are expected to become increasingly important for organizations (such as colleges and universities) that depend heavily on donations. More nonprofit organizations are focusing on cultivating an online presence and are increasingly using social media for fundraising activities.

Job Prospects

Competition for public relations and fundraising manager jobs is expected to be very strong.

Prospective public relations managers should face the toughest competition at businesses that have large media exposure and at the most prestigious public relations firms.

Job prospects for fundraising managers should be best for those with a master’s degree in philanthropic studies or fundraising. These degree programs lead to experience in the industry, giving graduates an advantage over those who do not have such experience.

Fashion Marketing Careers

Fashion Marketing can lead to many career paths. Some career choices you can pursue with an associate or a degree in fashion marketing are: Assistant store manager, Assistant buyer, Buyer, Department manager, Distribution planner, Fashion consultant, Merchandising assistant, Personal shopper, Product development assistant, Retail sales, Sales manager, Showroom sales, Stylist, Visual merchandising assistant, Wholesale.

May 2014 Occupational Employment and Wage Estimates - Austin-Round Rock-San Marcos, TX

Occupation codeOccupation titleMedian hourly wageMean hourly wageAnnual mean wageMean wage RSEEmployment Employment RSELocation quotient
11-3061Purchasing Managers$54.77$57.66$119,9405.5%33015.0%0.71
13-1022Wholesale and Retail Buyers, Except Farm Products$23.44$28.04$58,3205.5%68015.9%0.94
13-1023Purchasing Agents, Except Wholesale, Retail, and Farm Products$26.43$28.27$58,8002.6%2,1006.6%1.11
41-2031Retail Salespersons$10.82$13.21$27,4702.9%30,0004.4%1.00
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics
  • SOC Code Number: the Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) system's unique, six-digit (plus hyphen) numerical identifier for each occupation. When the SOC code is a link, clicking on it leads to a page that contains the occupational definition and national cross-industry estimates.
  • Occupation Title: a descriptive title that corresponds to the SOC code.
  • Median Hourly Wage: the estimated 50th percentile of the distribution of wages based on data collected from employers in all industries; 50 percent of workers in an occupation earn less than the median wage, and 50 percent earn more than the median wage.
  • Mean Hourly Wage: the estimated total hourly wages of an occupation divided by its estimated employment, i.e., the average hourly wage.
  • Mean Annual Wage: the estimated total annual wages of an occupation divided by its estimated employment, i.e., the average annual wage.
  • Mean RSE: the relative standard error of the mean wage estimates, a measure of the reliability or precision of the mean wage estimates. The relative standard error is defined as the ratio of the standard error to the survey estimate. For example, a relative standard error of 10 percent implies that the standard error is one-tenth as large as the survey estimate.
  • Employment: the estimated total occupational employment (not including self-employed).
  • Employment RSE: the Relative Standard Error of the employment estimate, a measure of the reliability or precision of the employment estimate. The relative standard error is defined as the ratio of the standard error to the survey estimate. For example, a relative standard error of 10 percent implies that the standard error is one-tenth as large as the survey estimate.
  • Location Quotient: (State, metropolitan, and nonmetropolitan statistical area estimates only) the ratio of an occupation's share of employment in a given area to that occupation's share of employment in the U.S. as a whole. For example, an occupation that makes up 10 percent of employment in a specific metropolitan area compared with 2 percent of U.S. employment would have a location quotient of 5 for the area in question.

About May 2014 National, State, Metropolitan, and Nonmetropolitan Area Occupational Employment and Wage Estimates

May 2014 Occupational Employment and Wage Estimates - Texas

Occupation codeOccupation titleMedian hourly wageMean hourly wageAnnual mean wageMean wage RSEEmployment Employment RSELocation quotient
11-3061Purchasing Managers$56.33$60.68$126,2202.3%4,2303.6%0.72
13-1021Buyers and Purchasing Agents, Farm Products$23.08$25.87$53,8205.3%51018.2%0.54
13-1022Wholesale and Retail Buyers, Except Farm Products$24.96$28.16$58,5702.1%8,3207.2%0.91
13-1023Purchasing Agents, Except Wholesale, Retail, and Farm Products$28.88$31.55$65,6300.8%25,3802.0%1.06
41-2031Retail Salespersons$10.04$12.48$25,9500.9%381,4001.4%1.01
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics
  • SOC Code Number: the Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) system's unique, six-digit (plus hyphen) numerical identifier for each occupation. When the SOC code is a link, clicking on it leads to a page that contains the occupational definition and national cross-industry estimates.
  • Occupation Title: a descriptive title that corresponds to the SOC code.
  • Median Hourly Wage: the estimated 50th percentile of the distribution of wages based on data collected from employers in all industries; 50 percent of workers in an occupation earn less than the median wage, and 50 percent earn more than the median wage.
  • Mean Hourly Wage: the estimated total hourly wages of an occupation divided by its estimated employment, i.e., the average hourly wage.
  • Mean Annual Wage: the estimated total annual wages of an occupation divided by its estimated employment, i.e., the average annual wage.
  • Mean RSE: the relative standard error of the mean wage estimates, a measure of the reliability or precision of the mean wage estimates. The relative standard error is defined as the ratio of the standard error to the survey estimate. For example, a relative standard error of 10 percent implies that the standard error is one-tenth as large as the survey estimate.
  • Employment: the estimated total occupational employment (not including self-employed).
  • Employment RSE: the Relative Standard Error of the employment estimate, a measure of the reliability or precision of the employment estimate. The relative standard error is defined as the ratio of the standard error to the survey estimate. For example, a relative standard error of 10 percent implies that the standard error is one-tenth as large as the survey estimate.
  • Location Quotient: (State, metropolitan, and nonmetropolitan statistical area estimates only) the ratio of an occupation's share of employment in a given area to that occupation's share of employment in the U.S. as a whole. For example, an occupation that makes up 10 percent of employment in a specific metropolitan area compared with 2 percent of U.S. employment would have a location quotient of 5 for the area in question.

About May 2014 National, State, Metropolitan, and Nonmetropolitan Area Occupational Employment and Wage Estimates

Purchasing Managers - 2014 Pay, 2014-2024 Job Outlook

Source: Occupational Outlook Handbook - Pay

The median annual wage for purchasing managers was $106,090 in May 2014. The median wage is the wage at which half the workers in an occupation earned more than that amount and half earned less. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $60,840, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $169,000.

In May 2014, the median annual wages for purchasing managers in the top industries in which they worked were as follows:

Federal government$123,980
Professional, scientific, and technical services122,750
Management of companies and enterprises116,380
Manufacturing96,520
Wholesale trade94,170

 

Most purchasing managers work full time. Overtime is common in this occupation.

Source: Occupational Outlook Handbook - Job Outlook

Employment of purchasing managers is projected to show little or no change from 2014 to 2024.

These workers will continue to be needed to oversee the purchase of goods and services for business operations or for resale to customers. In addition, purchasing managers often play an important role in controlling costs for an organization.

However, some organizations may increasingly rely on third parties to handle some of the tasks previously performed by purchasing managers, such as business strategy development and contract management.

In the public sector, employment demand may be negatively impacted by the increasing use of cooperative purchasing agreements. These agreements allow state, local, and municipal governments to share resources in order to buy supplies and make other general purchases. Because the same standard contracts can be used multiple times by multiple government agencies, the rise of purchasing cooperatives will likely limit the need to hire additional procurement officers and managers.

The projected decline in the manufacturing industry should also limit the demand for purchasing managers employed within that industry.

Job Prospects

As with many other managerial positions, competition for jobs is expected to be strong. Candidates for purchasing manager positions may improve their prospects by obtaining a master’s degree in business or supply management.

Buyers and Purchasing Agents - 2014 Pay, 2014-2024 Job Outlook

Source: Occupational Outlook Handbook - Pay

The median annual wage for buyers and purchasing agents was $58,520 in May 2014. The median wage is the wage at which half the workers in an occupation earned more than that amount and half earned less. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $34,370, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $97,070.

Median annual wages for buyers and purchasing agents in May 2014 were as follows:

Purchasing agents, except wholesale, retail, and farm products$60,980
Buyers and purchasing agents, farm products55,080
Wholesale and retail buyers, except farm products52,270

 

In May 2014, the median annual wages for buyers and purchasing agents in the top industries in which they worked were as follows:

Federal government$78,760
Management of companies and enterprises62,240
Manufacturing59,160
Wholesale trade53,170
Retail trade48,060

 

Most buyers and purchasing agents work full time. Overtime is common in these occupations. About 1 in 5 worked more than 40 hours per week in 2014.

Source: Occupational Outlook Handbook - Job Outlook

Employment of buyers and purchasing agents is projected to grow 2 percent from 2014 to 2024, slower than the average for all occupations.

These workers will continue to be needed to buy goods and services for business operations or for resale to customers. In addition, buyers and purchasing agents often play an important role in controlling costs for an organization.

However, growth may be negatively affected due to more outsourcing of less complex procurement functions like processing purchase orders or making one-time purchases of items. Some organizations also may rely on third parties to handle other tasks, such as performing market research or supplier risk assessments. Organizations may outsource these functions in order to focus on more complex or core procurement tasks and to reduce costs.

In the public sector, employment demand may be negatively impacted by the increasing use of cooperative purchasing agreements. These agreements allow state, local, and municipal governments to share resources in order to buy supplies and make other general purchases. Because the same standard contracts can be used multiple times by multiple government agencies, the rise of purchasing cooperatives may limit the need to hire additional procurement officers.

The projected decline in the manufacturing industry may also limit the demand for buyers and purchasing agents employed within this industry.

Job Prospects

Job prospects for those interested in becoming a buyer or purchasing agent should be good. Candidates with a bachelor’s degree, in addition to strong negotiating, communication, and interpersonal skills, are likely to have the best prospects.

Retail Sales Workers - 2014 Pay, 2014-2024 Job Outlook

Source: Occupational Outlook Handbook - Pay

The median hourly wage for parts salespersons was $14.15 in May 2014. The median wage is the wage at which half the workers in an occupation earned more than that amount and half earned less. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $8.90, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $24.40.

The median hourly wage for retail salespersons was $10.29 in May 2014. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $8.19, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $18.89.

In May 2014, the median hourly wages for retail sales workers in the top industries in which they worked were as follows:

Motor vehicle and parts dealers$14.72
Building material and garden equipment and supplies dealers12.15
Sporting goods, hobby, book, and music stores9.61
General merchandise stores9.56
Clothing and clothing accessories stores9.39

 

Compensation systems vary by type of establishment and merchandise sold. Retail sales workers get hourly wages, commissions, or a combination of the two. Under a commission system, they get a percentage of the sales they make. This system offers sales workers the opportunity to increase their earnings considerably, but they may find that their earnings depend strongly on their ability to sell their product and on the ups and downs of the economy.

Many retail sales workers work evenings and weekends, particularly during holidays and other peak sales periods. Because the end-of-year holiday season is often the busiest time, many employers limit sales workers’ use of vacation time between November and the beginning of January.

About 1 in 3 retail salespersons worked part time in 2014.

Source: Occupational Outlook Handbook - Job Outlook

Employment of retail sales workers is projected to grow 7 percent from 2014 to 2024, about as fast as the average for all occupations.

Employment of retail salespersons is projected to grow 7 percent from 2014 to 2024, about as fast as the average for all occupations. Employment of retail salespersons has traditionally grown with the overall economy.

Online sales have grown strongly in recent years, and this trend is expected to continue. Online sales will likely affect employment growth of retail sales workers in a few ways. “Brick and mortar” retail stores are expected to increase their emphasis on customer service as a way to compete with online sellers. Therefore, traditional retail stores should hire more sales workers to provide this service. In addition, cost pressure may drive retailers to ask their in-store staff to do more. This means they may want workers who can perform a broad range of job duties that include helping customers find items, operating a cash register, and re-stocking shelves. Because retail sales workers have this versatile range of functions, their usage should also increase. However, online sales strength is also expected to limit the growth of the number of physical retail stores. Therefore, the limited number of stores may constrain overall employment growth, even though retail sales workers use within these stores should increase.

Online sales are projected to affect specific segments of the retail industry to varying extents. For instance, book and media stores are likely to see the most severe declines due to online competition. However, other retail segments, such as automobile dealers and clothing stores, have experienced much less of an impact. In general, although consumers are increasing their online retail shopping, they will continue to do the majority of their retail shopping in stores. Retail salespersons will be needed in stores to help customers and complete sales.

Employment of parts salespersons is projected to grow 7 percent from 2014 to 2024, about as fast as the average for all occupations. People are keeping their cars longer and are buying new cars less often. Older cars need to be serviced more frequently, creating demand for car parts and parts salespersons. However, growth may be slowed by competition from online parts retailers.

Job Prospects

Many workers leave this occupation, which means there will be a large number of job openings. This should result in many employment opportunities for qualified workers.