Prerequisites

ENGL 1301:
TSI complete in Reading & Writing or exempt

ENGL 1302:
ENGL 1301 or equivalent w/ minimum grade of C

ENGL 2300-level:
ENGL 1301 & ENGL 1302 or equivalents w/ minimum grade of C

HONORS:
Contact the ACC Honors Program

* Note: ENGL 1301 & 1302 are required for all literature classes

ENGL 1301: English Composition I (3-3-0)

Intensive study of and practice in writing processes, from invention and researching to drafting, revising, and editing, both individually and collaboratively. Emphasis on effective rhetorical choices, including audience, purpose, arrangement, and style. Focus on writing the academic essay as a vehicle for learning, communicating, and critical analysis.

ENGL 1301: TSI complete in Reading and Writing or exempt
Departmental Syllabus: ENGL 1301: Composition I

ENGL 2322 - British Literature: Anglo-Saxon Through 18th Century (3-3-0)

A survey of the development of British literature from the Anglo-Saxon period to the Eighteenth Century. Students will study works of prose, poetry, drama, and fiction in relation to their historical, linguistic, and cultural contexts. Texts will be selected from a diverse group of authors and traditions

ENGL 2000-level: ENGL 1301 & ENGL 1302 or equivalents w/ minimum grade of C
Departmental Syllabus  >>>

ENGL 2327 - American Literature: Beginnings through Civil War (3-3-0)

A survey of American literature from the period of exploration and settlement through the Civil War. Students will study works of prose, poetry, drama, and fiction in relation to their historical and cultural contexts. Texts will be selected from among a diverse group of authors for what they reflect and reveal about the evolving American experience and character.

ENGL 2000-level: ENGL 1301 & ENGL 1302 or equivalents w/ minimum grade of C
Departmental Syllabus  >>>

ENGL 2332 - World Literature: Ancient World through 17th Century (3-3-0)

A survey of world literature from the ancient world through the sixteenth century. Students will study works of prose, poetry, drama, and fiction in relation to their historical and cultural contexts. Texts will be selected from a diverse group of authors and traditions.

ENGL 2000-level: ENGL 1301 & ENGL 1302 or equivalents w/ minimum grade of C
Departmental Syllabus  >>>

ENGL 1302: English Composition II (3-3-0)

Intensive study of and practice in the strategies and techniques for developing research-based expository and persuasive texts. Emphasis on effective and ethical rhetorical inquiry, including primary and secondary research methods; critical reading of verbal, visual, and multimedia texts; systematic evaluation, synthesis, and documentation of information sources; and critical thinking about evidence and conclusions.

ENGL 1302: ENGL 1301 or equivalent w/ minimum grade of C
Departmental Syllabus: ENGL 1302: Composition II

ENGL 2323 - British Literature: 18th Century to the Present (3-3-0)

A survey of the development of British literature from the Romantic period to the present. Students will study works of prose, poetry, drama, and fiction in relation to their historical and cultural contexts. Texts will be selected from a diverse group of authors and traditions.

ENGL 2000-level: ENGL 1301 & ENGL 1302 or equivalents w/ minimum grade of C
Departmental Syllabus  >>>

ENGL 2328 - American Literature: Civil War to the Present (3-3-0)

A survey of American literature from the Civil War to the present. Students will study works of prose, poetry, drama, and fiction in relation to their historical and cultural contexts. Texts will be selected from among a diverse group of authors for what they reflect and reveal about the evolving American experience and character.

ENGL 2000-level: ENGL 1301 & ENGL 1302 or equivalents w/ minimum grade of C
Departmental  Syllabus  >>>

ENGL 2333 - World Literature: 18th Century to the Present (3-3-0)

A survey of world literature from the seventeenth century to the present. Students will study works of prose, poetry, drama, and fiction in relation to their historical and cultural contexts. Texts will be selected from a diverse group of authors and traditions.

ENGL 2000-level: ENGL 1301 & ENGL 1302 or equivalents w/ minimum grade of C
Departmental Syllabus  >>>

ENGL 2351: Mexican-American Literature (3-3-0)

A survey of Mexican American/Chicanx literature from Mesoamerica to the present. Students will study literary works of fiction, poetry, drama, essays, and memoirs in relation to their historical, linguistic, political, regional, gendered, and cultural contexts. Texts will be selected from a diverse group of authors, literary movements, and media forms. Topics and themes may include the literary performance of identity and culture, aesthetic mediation of racialization, struggle and protest, and artistic activism.

ENGL 2000-level: ENGL 1301 & ENGL 1302 or equivalents w/ minimum grade of C
Departmental Syllabus  >>>

Integrated Reading & Writing

INRW 0230: Integrated College Reading and Writing Strategies (2-2-0)

Integration of critical reading and academic writing skills. This course is not for college-level credit. Repeatable up to six-credit hours. INRW 0230 is a co-requisite course that will be paired with a college-level course. Prerequisites: as listed in chart below.

Departmental Syllabus  >>>

INRW 0230 Prerequisites
Reading Scores Writing Scores – Objective Writing Scores – Essay Course Placement Options Notes
347 or above [or C or bettern in INRW 0420]  *344-345
with Holistic Advising

346 or above
 [or a C or better in INRW 0420]

3 or above INRW 0230 + co-requisite college
credit course
ENGL 1301
EXIT course for both reading and writing

Students must be enrolled in both courses 

INRW 0420: Intermediate Integrated Reading and Writing Strategies

Students will improve their college reading and writing skills both in and out of class through integrated reading and writing activities. Daily and major writing assignments will offer students the opportunity to master the reading and writing processes and the critical thinking skills necessary to complete college work. Students will read and write for expressive, informative, and persuasive purposes.

Departmental Syllabus  >>>

INRW 0430 Prerequisites
Reading Scores Writing Scores – Objective Writing Scores – Essay Course Placement Options Notes
344 or above [or C or better in INRW 0420]  340 or above [or C or better in INRW 0420] 3 or above INRW 0430 with 1 hr. lab

EXIT course for both reading and writing

INRW 0430: Integrated College Reading and Writing Strategies (4-4-1)

Integration of critical reading and academic writing skills. This course is not for college-level credit. Repeatable up to six- credit hours.

Departmental Syllabus  >>>

INRW 0420 Prerequisites
Reading Scores Writing Scores – Objective Writing Scores – Essay Course Placement Options Notes
310-343 310-339 4 or below INRW 0420 with 1 hr. lab

Not an exit course

Intermediate course for students needing reading and writing at the lower level

INRW 0340: Integrated Reading and Writing Strategies

Emphasis on increased proficiency of comprehension skills, vocabulary development, and rate of reading. Ninth grade reading level required. INRW 0340 repeatable up to six credit hours. A modified course is offered in a one hour (0120) and two hour (0220) format.

Departmental Syllabus  >>>

INRW 0340 Prerequisites
Reading Scores Writing Scores – Objective Writing Scores – Essay Course Placement Options Notes

*344-645 with Holistic Advising

347 or above [or C or better in INRW 0420]

 346 or above [or C or better in INRW 0420] 3 or above INRW 0340 + co-requisite college
credit course:
HIST 1301 or 1302
or SOCI 1301
or SPCH 1315
or ENGL 1301
or HUMA 1301 or 1302
or GOVT 2305

EXIT course for both reading and writing

Students must be enrolled in both courses 

Programs

Liberal Arts Gateway

A study of deep engagement with the liberal arts with the knowledge and skills needed to thrive in a pluralistic society. See details below.

Liberal Arts Gateway Program  >>>

Liberal Arts Gateway Principals

LIBERAL ARTS GATEWAY GUIDING PRINCIPLES

PLURALISM
The Liberal Arts celebrate diversity. Pluralism holds that people of different beliefs, experiences, and values all have a voice within a thriving democracy and a thriving classroom. Respecting and exploring many ways of seeing produces the fullest vision.

LITERACIES
The Liberal Arts celebrate all forms of literacy. Linguistic creativity, power, and precision exist within many communities, though certain literacies are culturally dominant and bring access to opportunity and power. A key goal is to investigate how different communities and disciplines think, speak, read, write, and understand evidence.

EVIDENCE
The Liberal Arts celebrate evidence-based thinking as the basis for arriving at fact and truth. Key to the pursuit of truth are research-based inquiry, flexible thinking, awareness of biases, learning from mistakes, and attention to nuance and context.

EQUITY
The Liberal Arts celebrate equity and seek to understand barriers to equity and access in all areas of society. A core goal is the investigation of root causes of inequity and commitment to providing opportunity.

ENGAGEMENT
The Liberal Arts celebrate intellectual curiosity and the pursuit of truth. Students are encouraged to bring their experiences and passions to the classroom. They are encouraged to be open-minded and to focus on exploration and personal growth within a supportive learning environment.

Honors CLS Courses

ACC Composition & Literary Studies classes are also offered through the Honors Program, which offers core curriculum courses with an emphasis on in-depth research and discussion in small classes limited to 15 students. See details below.

Honors Program
Honors Program  >>>

Honors Courses
CLS Honors Courses  >>>
ACC Honors Course Profiles  >>>

What Students Should Expect in CLS Courses

In our classes, you can expect to read thought-provoking articles and works of literature from diverse writers. You might have a film or video assigned as well. During class, expect to share your ideas as well as listen to the ideas and insights from other students. CLS courses are a place to sharpen your critical thinking and your writing skills!

Courses in CLS include reading, writing, and research. Most classes require essays, including research and analysis papers; classes may also have quizzes and exams. The best place to find out about required assignments is by reading your instructor’s syllabus, which lists the readings and due dates.

If you’re getting ready to take ENGL 1301, please check out our hand-out called Expectations for Incoming ENGL 1301 Students. That lists the skills you’re expected to have before starting ENGL 1301.

Expectations for Incoming ENGL 1301 Students

Below are the skills we expect students to have a basic understanding of when they enter Composition I.

  Reading

  • Know the difference between fact and opinion.
  • Read a text and summarize it.
  • Read a paragraph and identify the main idea.

Content Development

  • Use correct and appropriate diction.
  • Know the difference between objective and subjective.
  • Use examples and other supporting details to support ideas.

Organization

  1. Write an introduction that introduces the topic and leads to the thesis.
  2. Write a thesis statement that addresses the writing prompt.
  3. Organize a paragraph using a main idea/topic sentence, explanations, and examples.
  4. Write sentences that connect ideas with transitions and are ordered logically.
  5. Write a conclusion that reinforces the thesis.

Grammar/Mechanics Sentence Construction

  • Construct complete sentences—avoid run-ons, splices, and fragments. Sentences should make sense.
  • Demonstrate subject-verb agreement.
  • Keep verb tense consistent.
  • Keep sentences parallel.
  • Use correct verb endings.

Grammar

  • Use correct punctuation, including commas, periods, question marks, exclamation marks, quotation marks, and apostrophes.
  • Follow capitalization rules.
  • Use pronouns correctly (case, agreement, and reference).

ESOL Issues

  • Choose correct prepositions.
  • Use the correct form of commonly confused English words and idioms.
  • Use correct verb forms.

Documentation

  • Have awareness that one needs to document sources.
  • Understand the definition and examples of plagiarism.

Sample Content & Resources

Reading Lists & Rubrics

Explore sample reading lists to see our diverse ranges of interests and reading selections. Explore our rubrics to see how our assessment works.

Sample Reading Lists & Rubrics
Other Resources

Check out some helpful resources from the Department of Composition and Literary Studies faculty.

Contact Info & Links

Contact Us

Dr. Wendy Lym

Department Chair
Rio Grande Campus
Building 3000, Rm. 3120
Office: 512-223-3357
wlym@austincc.edu

Sue Bloodsworth

Administrative Assistant III
Rio Grande Campus
Building 3000, Rm. 3171
Office: 512-223-3233
sbloodsw@austincc.edu
Hours: M-F 8am–5pm

Austin Community College
5930 Middle Fiskville Rd.
Austin, Texas 78752
512-223-7000