Photo Story: Collings Guitars

Photo story by, Kelly West News Photography One Class, Fall 15′

Collings Guitars, which started as a one-man shop in the mid-1970s, has grown to include more than 70 full-time employees and an expanding facility on the western edge of Travis County. Bill Collings dropped out of college as a pre-med major and started repairing and building guitars, and eventually hired his first employee in 1989, who still works for the company.

The Collings shop turns out high-quality acoustic and electric guitars, as well as mandolins and ukuleles, and most steps of the production process are performed painstakingly by hand. The cost of the guitars can range anywhere from $3,500 to $6,000 or more, depending on how custom the design is.

Collings instruments are played by a variety of musicians, including Lyle Lovett, Lloyd Maines, and Patti Smith.

[Students from the News Photography 1316 class spent a morning documenting the work and craftsmanship at Collings Guitars, and complied a photo story from the assignment.]

Jerome Little, an employee of Collings Guitars, a local guitar manufacturer since the 1970’s, sands a piece of an electric guitar inside the Collings facility in Austin, Texas. October 9, 2015. photo by Anneke Paterson
Hard at work – An employee Sands a piece of an electric guitar inside the Collings facility. Photo by Anneke Paterson.
Collings Guitars is a stringed instrument manufacturer established in 1973 in Austin, Texas. Reid Albach smooths out the sides of an acoustic guitar on Friday, October 9th. photo by Mario Cantu
Smoothing out the edges – Reid Albach smooths out the sides of an acoustic guitar. Photo by Mario Cantu.
Collings guitars, a handmade guitar and mandolin company located on highway 290 W in Austin, TX has been locally owned and operated for over 20 years. A satin finish A-Model MT mandolin made by Collings Guitars receives its final adjustments before completion Friday October 9th, 2015. photo by Nicholas Skelton-Tangredi
Collings guitars – A satin finish A-Model MT mandolin made receives its final adjustments before completion. Photo by Nicholas Skelton-Tangredi.
Jerome Little, an employee of Collings Guitars, uses a chisel tool to finish a piece of an electric guitar inside the Collings facility in Austin, Texas on October 9, 2015. photo by Anneke Paterson
It’s all in the details – Jerome Little, an employee of Collings Guitars, uses a chisel tool to finish a piece of an electric guitar inside the facility. Photo by Anneke Paterson.
Scott Butts assembles a bridge to a Mandolin at Collings Guitars in Austin, Texas on Friday Oct. 09, 2015. photo by Mario Cantu
Putting it all together – Scott Butts assembles a bridge to a Mandolin at Collings. Photo by Mario Cantu.
Andrew Murray makes small cuts into a guitar, a process called kerfing which requires intricate and skilled work. photo by Mario Cantu
It takes skills – Andrew Murray makes small cuts into a guitar, a process called kerfing which requires intricate and skilled work. photo by Mario Cantu
Ed Rodriguez repairs an old guitar at Collings Guitars, located in Austin, Texas on Friday, October 9th, 2015 . The C10 series acoustic was sent back to Collings for a scratch made at the headstock. photo by Chloe Bennett
Making repairs – Ed Rodriguez repairs an old guitar. The C10 series acoustic was sent back to Collings for a scratch made at the headstock. Photo by Chloe Bennett

 

For a look at how Collings employees take a break to have fun during the day, enjoy this short video at http://bcove.me/z93mtt9m.

Beast of Bass and Boom

Marshall C. Simpson— First Place

“The piece was inspired by my music taste. I enjoy electronic and industrial and I felt I could convey that liking through a visual representation.”

Accent holds contests each semester to showcase student art, photography and writing. Art major Marshall C. Simpson’s “Beast of Bass and Boom” was created with ink on paper. Sumbissions of original artwork may be sent to [email protected]

Student Voice- Community College

Joseph Lee, Photographer 

How has community college changed your life?

 

Shikha J
Shikha Johnson — Community College is less stressful in that the classes are easier. However, it is a lot smaller and is hard to be socially involved.
Long H
Long Ho — Classrooms are small. It’s easier for me to pay attention, which is good because I gained from it. It’s easy to make friends.
Jay P
Jay Patel — College has helped me movie forward in my career by teaching different skill sets in order to get a better job.
Corinne M
Corinne Medford — Helped me realize the importance of education as well as gaining an interest in receiving one.

 

Spring 2015 Photo Story Winner: Inking Austin One Body at a Time

Photo Contest : Inking Austin One Body at a Time {First Place Winner}

Photo Story Krystal Anzaldua

 

Featured Photo Above: Closing Tine — Tattoo artist Garrett Potts locks up his shop after a long day. Mom’s Tattoos is open 7 days a week, and is located at 1703 South Lamar.

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Teaming up — Artist Garret Potts tattoos a peacock feather on April Hernandez, 24, while Gary Stiles tattoos another client.
#2 Sarah Conner, 24, is discussing where to get her first tattoo with tattoo artist Garrett Potts
That’s the spot –– Potts watches Sarah Conner, 24, carefully decides on the perfect for her tattoo.
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Tasteful Art — Artist Garret Potts tattoos a hamburger on Kim Burnet, 32. Afterwards, she will be given a complimentary Care Kit to ensure proper healing.
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Decisions,Decisions — Garrett Potts, 34, discusses tattoo sketch options with Chris Holmes, 27 and John Holmes, 54
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Artist’s Palette — An assortment of ink is laid out for the tattoo artist.
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Sketching it out — Pots sketches out the tattoo design, and prepares the stencil that will be placed directly onto the skin.
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Keeping it fresh — tattoos fade with time; Potts touches up a piece previously done on a client.

Leadership and Diversity Conference

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Story and Photos by Ryan Fotenette-Mitchell

Thought provoking conversations took center stage at the Nov. 21 Leadership and Diversity Conference. Attendees at the Highland Campus event explored lesbian, gay, bi-sexual and transgender issues.

Austin Community College Student Life staff member Angela Roberston discussed the main objective for conference.

“So today, our intent was to challenge students to learn to love and respect one another even when they disagree,” Robertson said.

A religious panel addressed LGBTQ issues in the context of faith and Biblical references. Michael Saenz, a student at ACC, said that we should consider a more modern approach than that laid out in the Bible.

“A lot of people are basing what they believe on what was written thousands of years ago. The views that were applied then don’t apply now,” Saenz said. “If someone loves someone else, it baffles me that its illegal for them to get married.”

Robertson talked about how she challenged students to make their own opinions and beliefs, as well as having respect for people with different beliefs than them.

“There were people that were challenged. There were people that were emotional,” Robertson said.  “And that’s kind of what has to happen. We have to get uncomfortable so that we can grow.”

ACC student Elizabeth Cognetti felt called into action by the event.

“I’ve always been empathetic towards people who struggle day by day.” Cognetti said. “It makes me want to be able to stand up and really do something about it.”

 ACC holds a Leadership and Diversity Conference every year. For more information visit the Student Life website.

 

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GAY PRIDE –– By standers observe students during the LGBTQ summit. The summit was held at the ACC Highland Campus Nov. 21.
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GETTING AQUAINTED –– Keynote speaker Clint-Micheal Reneau leads the first breakout session of the day which allowed students to share their thoughts on LGBTQ issues. Most students came from different campuses for the event.
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PASSION AND POETRY — Joe Anderson of  The Mahogany project shares his story about being gay African-American man through poetry. Students sat and watched three live performances from the group.
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RESPECT FOR ALL –– Jennifer Flowers, Student Life coordinator,  stands proudly in front of the Gay Pride flag. The flag was one of many banners to represent different groups.
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COMING TOGETHER –– Students sit in the stairway to learn more about LGBTQ issues from keynote speaker Clint-Michael Reneau. Banners set around the stairway showed support for equality.

Photo Contest: Every Day Life on the Sand Holler Farm {First Place Winner}

Congratulations to Tyler Weems, First Place Winner in the Accent’s 2014 Photo Essay Contest!

 

Every Day Life on the Sand Hollar Farm

Stephanie and Scott Little created the Sand Holler Farm in 2008 in Dale, Texas. The farm has grown into a large operation where animals are raised and organic foods are grown.
Stephanie and Scott Little created the Sand Holler Farm in 2008 in Dale, Texas. The farm has grown into a large operation where animals are raised and organic foods are grown.

 

Scott Little begins making his rounds early on the morning of November 16, 2013 to make sure everyone working is on task. "They know I'm just walking around to give them a hand if they need one," Scott said playfully with a friendly smile on his face.
Scott Little begins making his rounds early on the morning of November 16, 2013 to make sure everyone working is on task. “They know I’m just walking around to give them a hand if they need one,” Scott said playfully with a friendly smile on his face.

 

Kevin Becker diligently works on creating new rows of soil on the morning of November 16 to replace the summer jalepeño plants with winter lettuce plants. "Transition time of the year is always the hardest work, but it's just something that has to be done," Kevin said.
Kevin Becker diligently works on creating new rows of soil on the morning of November 16 to replace the summer jalepeño plants with winter lettuce plants. “Transition time of the year is always the hardest work, but it’s just something that has to be done,” Kevin said.

 

After laughing at a comment about the only chicken with "feathery clown feet," Lauryn Williams picks him up to get a closer look on December 1.
After laughing at a comment about the only chicken with “feathery clown feet,” Lauryn Williams picks him up to get a closer look on December 1.

 

Scott Johnson, Courtney Harrington, and Jared Howard stand surrounded by ducks on an almost-freezing, December 10 morning. "No, no! Not me!" Courtney yelled jokingly as they discussed who would change out the coops that day.
Scott Johnson, Courtney Harrington, and Jared Howard stand surrounded by ducks on an almost-freezing, December 10 morning. “No, no! Not me!” Courtney yelled jokingly as they discussed who would change out the coops that day.

 

As Sand Holler switched from summer to winter crops, jalepeño plants were ripped out of the ground to be placed in a compost pile November 16. Scott Little picks and breaks open one of the last jalepeños of the season.
As Sand Holler switched from summer to winter crops, jalepeño plants were ripped out of the ground to be placed in a compost pile November 16. Scott Little picks and breaks open one of the last jalepeños of the season.

 

December 10, 2013 brought along an icy morning, but Scott Johnson works through the cold to continue planting onions while Courtney Harrington finishes the icy task of watering the rest of the plants.
December 10, 2013 brought along an icy morning, but Scott Johnson works through the cold to continue planting onions while Courtney Harrington finishes the icy task of watering the rest of the plants.

 

Tess, the angora goat, took a break from grazing on November 16 to observe the happenings beyond the fencing of her one-acre pen.
Tess, the angora goat, took a break from grazing on November 16 to observe the happenings beyond the fencing of her one-acre pen.

 

After the sun had warmed the early afternoon of December 1, Lauryn Williams came outside to grind unused tree limbs to make small wood chips for the new rows of soil being made for the winter crops. "There's so much dang mulch in my shoe," she said with a laugh.
After the sun had warmed the early afternoon of December 1, Lauryn Williams came outside to grind unused tree limbs to make small wood chips for the new rows of soil being made for the winter crops. “There’s so much dang mulch in my shoe,” she said with a laugh.
After working since 6 a.m. December 10, dealing with flat tractor tires and struggling to start fires with wood dampened in the recent rain , Anna Stanley and Brian Fontenot take a well-deserved rest of the day off as their dog, Rusko, follows.
After working since 6 a.m. December 10, dealing with flat tractor tires and struggling to start fires with wood dampened in the recent rain , Anna Stanley and Brian Fontenot take a well-deserved rest of the day off as their dog, Rusko, follows.