Indigenous Peoples Day: Importance of Heritage & Pride

The second Monday of October has been identified as Columbus Day since the year 1937; however, since 1977, many individuals have begun to call this day Indigenous Peoples’ Day to celebrate the lives and culture of Native Americans.

By: Grant E. Loveless

The second Monday of October has been identified as Columbus Day since the year 1937; however, since 1977, many individuals have begun to call this day Indigenous Peoples’ Day to celebrate the lives and culture of Native Americans. 

This day is centered on both celebration and reflection: celebrating people and their heritage, culture and tribal roots as well as reflecting on tragic stories in history that hurt, but in a way strengthened the Indigenous community. 

 Indigenous Peoples Day is a “holiday celebrating the original inhabitants of North America, observed instead of Columbus Day in some U.S localities,” according to the Associated Press Stylebook, with the goal to unify others as well as bring awareness to issues plaguing their communities. With this goal comes hardship as many still want to celebrate Christopher Columbus, a glorified figure who in reality scarred Indigenous people of America for centuries to come. 

Too often do many forget that Indigenous people were ravaged by diseases brought over from Europe, forced from their tribal land as the United States expanded and, even more recently, sterilized in large numbers.

 For the Native community, Columbus Day has long been hurtful. It negatively affects and hurts those who are Indigenous and glorifies the violent history of 500 years of colonial oppression at the hands of European explorers and those who settled in the United States — history in which many Native and Indigenous folx say still has ramifications and wounds that run deep today. 

Many states have taken initiative to celebrate the second Monday of October while also celebrating the culture and lives of Indigenous people by renaming the holiday. The movement to replace Columbus Day with Indigenous Peoples Day or Native American Day has gained momentum and spread to states, cities and towns across the United States. 

Indigenous Peoples Day recognizes, and honors the beautiful cultures, traditions and lives of Indigeous People around the world. At Austin Community College students and staff annually celebrate Indigenous Peoples Day by educating its community of Native American history. 

Drawing attention to the trauma, broken treaties, broken promises and erasure brought by the celebration of Christopher Columbus. Prior to his arrival, Indigenous people were self-sufficient, thriving and successful communities that sustained and created life thousands of years. 

For Indigenoeu Folx, Repeat This! “I am here. I am Indigenous. And I am brilliant.” This is your affirmation today as we MUST celebrate Indigenous Peoples’ Day for those who are gone, those who are here, and those who will be. Indigenous Peoples’ Day is so much more than a day, and we are counting on everyone to make that known.

 To stand beside Indigenous people and say vote for people who will use their time in office to revitalize, invest and uplift communities of color. 

Want to celebrate or honor Indigenous people today or be more mindful of the Indeigenous community? Here are five ways you can”

  1. Plant native plants where you are! It’s never too late to thank and show appreciation to Mother Earth.
  2. Read Indigenous literature!
  3. Attend an online or in-person Indigenous Peoples’ Day celebration!
  4. Help teach a more truthful history of Columbus and the Indigenous peoples of the Caribbean Islands!
  5. Learn more by advocating and showing solidarity for Indigenous Peoples’ Day.

Getting Remote Career Ready with ACC Career Services

We talk to ACC Career Service about the best ways to adapt to a tumultuous job market.

By Adam Cherian

Need help preparing for the job market during a pandemic? We talk to ACC Career Service about the best ways to adapt to a tumultuous job market.

In the turbulent job market that COVID-19 has created, it’s essential that college students adopt the best qualifications for remote or online work. Given the volatile nature of this pandemic, it’s been stated as the safest option to search for work is remotely. Because there is no conclusive end to this pandemic, remote work seems to be the norm. That being said, there are new sets of skills that students need to adopt with such a shift in conditions. Career Services provides the best ways for ACC students to prepare for a career, remotely.

  1. Check Out the Job Search Page on the ACC Career Services Page
    • The best way to start your job search during a time when most things are remote is with this helpful page. ACC Career Services realize that the pandemic has hit working ACC students hard. So to help those who have lost their jobs, they created a page where you can look for job listings in your area. There is an excellent amount of positions ranging from in your field of study, to entry level jobs. Give it a look to help you find the best remote career opportunities.
  2. Read the Career Essentials Student Reference Guide (2019/2020)
    • This guide is a game changer! You will be given the most essential steps in how to prepare for applying for jobs. This guide is extensive, with sixty pages of extremely helpful information. It details everything from resumé tips, to Linkedin profile checklists. Better securing a good remote job is made easy with this guide, as it gives you the best tools to make you stand out. Consider giving this a read when applying for jobs to better prepare yourself, and to impress your future employers!
  3. Take a Glance at the ACC Resumé Guide
    • Need more help making your resumé stand out? During a time where remote work is becoming more necessary, a resumé that exceeds your employers expectations is a crucial step in securing a job. ACC Career Services has a resumé guide that is filled with tips, instructions, and examples to make sure you secure that remote position! Give this a read if you want to give your resumé a professional finish.
  4. Consider Practice Interviews using Big Interview
    • The interview process is always nerve-racking. With the added pressure of remote interviews and technological barriers, this process can be scary. Thankfully, ACC Career Services provides us with a platform where you can practice interviewing in your specific field. You can use this to practice at any time because the questions are pre-recorded. Give this a try and see how helpful practicing real world interviews virtually can be.
  5. Schedule an Appointment with a Career Counselor
    • Once you have visited all the other resources ACC Career Services has to offer, it’s time to visit with a career counselor. Career counselors will offer you with the best advice on how to get, and prepare yourself for a new job. Speaking with professionals on how to better suit yourself for a remote job is priceless, and ACC offers it for just that! If you want to understand everything you need to know for remote work, schedule an appointment with a counselor today! 

The year 2020 has thrown everyone for a loop. Hopefully these resources will help ACC students better prepare for the remote job market. These are the best for career readiness, and ACC students are privileged enough to get this for free!

National Hispanic Heritage Month

National Hispanic Heritage Month actually started off as only two days. During the 1960s civil rights movement, Californian Congressman George E. Brown California wanted to recognize the role Hispanics played in the United States.

 by Melanie Laporte

National Hispanic Heritage Month actually started off as only two days. During the 1960s civil rights movement, Californian Congressman George E. Brown California wanted to recognize the role Hispanics played in the United States. He was behind a law stating the president would issue annual proclamations for September 15 and 16 be observed with “ceremony and activities.” 

President Lyndon Johnson issued the first week-long proclamation in 1988 then President Reagan signed off on a full month of National Hispanic Heritage lasting until Oct.15. Every president thereafter has annually signed the proclamation.  

Mexican bread of the dead on clay dish with candles and flowers

National Hispanic Heritage Month celebrates the contributions, achievements, and histories of men and women of Hispanic origin as well as recalling the work of the early Spanish explorers and settlers.

Now, National Hispanic Heritage Month is celebrated from Sept. 15 to Oct. 15. The observance starts in the middle of September to commemorate anniversaries of independence for the Latin American countries of Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua as well as Mexico’s independence.

In everyday life, people on the East Coast tend to identify as Hispanic whereas West coast residents use Latino according to the US Office of Management and Budget. But what is the difference between Hispanic and Latino/LatinX? 

Latino is anyone of Latin origin or ancestry in the Western Hemisphere including Brazil where Portuguese is the official language. 

The Census Bureau categorizes Hispanic is anyone with lineage from a Spanish-speaking country regardless of race: Guatemala, El Salvador, Mexico, Honduras, Panama, Ecuador, Colombia, Peru, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico, Venezuela, Bolivia, Paraguay, Uruguay, Chile, Nicaragua, Argentina, and Cuba.   Hispanics are linked by similar traditions of music, food, dance, culture, and one language: Spanish. Note, LatinX is the gender neutral term.

According to the Pew Research Center, there is a tendency to not identify as Latino as children assimilate into the US cultural melting pot. To not identify as “other” or foreign and the first thing people let go is language. It happens in almost every immigrant group. 

When a community loses what makes them different and unique, the entire country loses. It’s important to keep a strong identity and rich traditions then teach others about culture through music, dance, and pop culture to foster understanding and appreciation. 

National Hispanic Heritage Month is a time for all people to celebrate Hispanic history and community, culturally and economically. Firstly, start by supporting local Hispanic small businesses such as restaurants and speciality stores. Develop your spanish speaking abilities and donate to philanthropic groups like CASA and Somos. 

How to observe National Hispanic Heritage Month or Learn about the LatinX Community

 Austin Community College 
City of Austin
  • Meals on Wheels help deliver meals to hungry seniors as well as keeping them company.
  • CASA be an advocate volunteer to help abused and neglected children.
  • Latinitas give to or volunteer with the first digital magazine made by and for young Latinitas empowering all girls to innovate through media and technology.
  • Mexic-Arte Museum walk around the Official Mexican + Mexican American Museum of Texas to buy Made in Mexico embroidered Covid masks and see modern Latin art expositions. 
  • Emma S. Barrientos Mexican American Cultural Center – watch films from Mexico’s Golden Age of Cinema like Cantinflas, browse impactful art exhibits, make sugar skull masks, and learn from the online courses about Hispanic culture such as Lowriders: All about Austin’s Chicano Lowrider Culture.
  • Puerto Rican Cultural Center join them for Fiesta Boricua and the Paseo podcast with highlights from the Puerto Rican community 
  • Esquina Tango take Spanish language and Argentine tango dance classes.  
  • Somos Austin contact them to celebrate the city’s vibrant Latio community. 
  • Young Hispanic Professional Association of Austin gain leadership and professional development opportunities as well as scholarships and mentorship programs withYHPAA.
  • Hispanic Impact Fund give what you can or volunteer to the fund helping lift Hispanics in early childhood education, health and wellness, and develop critical job skills.