What I Learned from Online Tutoring

Written by Marissa Greene

The need to make assignment deadlines, ace quizzes and exams, and overall perform well in each enrolled course can sometimes be overwhelming for students. Especially when you are taking a class that you may find challenging to do well in. Thankfully, there are some knowledgeable individuals dedicated to helping you improve as a student. They are called tutors and you should definitely meet with one. Here are five things that I learned from online tutoring at Austin Community College. 

Tutoring is for Everyone
Online tutoring is a great tool for any student aiming for success this semester. Whether it’s understanding the calculus homework, perfecting that one essay, or even needing some guidance in your courses if English isn’t your first language, ACC online tutoring has you covered! Many times, students assume that tutoring is the last resort to take when your grades start going south. However, at the beginning of each semester, many professors from all areas of study encourage students to familiarize themselves and utilize tutoring in order to maintain those high grades from the very start.

Finding Your Tutor is as Easy as 123
Don’t think online tutoring can help you? The dynamic and versatile team of six online tutors might ask you to reconsider. From a specific class subject to general test taking strategies, students have the opportunity to browse through the online tutor’s profile and find the tutor best suited for their academic needs. While reading through their bio’s you’ll learn how dedicated they are to helping Riverbats succeed and even pick up some special learning methods that they can apply to other classes in the future.  

Planning for Tutoring Sessions
Want to make the most out of your tutoring sessions? Planning and preparing for each session is just as important as the tutoring itself. Before your meeting with an online tutor, create a few measurable goals of what you would like to accomplish by the end of the session along with some questions regarding the course material that can help you get there. Have your notes, textbook, and any other course materials within an arm’s reach. Create an organized and quiet space to conduct the session. For tips on this, read ACCENT’s tips on how to create a remote workspace.  

Unlimited and Free ACC Tutoring
ACC online tutoring is completely free and every riverbat has an unlimited number of tutoring sessions that they can schedule. Another resource that ACC students can take advantage of is receiving live online assistance with a tutor from Brainfuse, one of Austin Community College’s partnerships to create a more enriching learning experience. Every student is allotted 300 minutes (five hours) of online Brainfuse tutoring.

Online Tutoring Adapts to Your Needs
Students who are in need of an interpreter, seeking to learn studying habits that can reduce academic stress, and wanting to feel more confident in a specific subject can all benefit from online tutoring. The tutors who are excited to help you better understand concepts so that you can do your best this semester.

To get started, complete an online tutoring request form located at https://www.austincc.edu/students/tutoring/online

Being on the Front Lines of Advocacy, Change and Justice

We Are Here & We Will Be Seen

By: Grant E. Loveless

grant lovelessIn America we are young, tired and traumatized. We are tired of validating our space, our existence and the reason why we should have a seat at the table. Youth are continuously ignored, being dismissed, and unheard. Stereotyping youth as “too young” or “not experienced enough” has been a
consistent strategy to devalue the movements that we create.

Youth are dying. Bullets piercing our skin, the hands of our “ protectors ” bruise us, while the weight of our own communities burden us with expectations that we, as a future generation, are expected to embrace.
Not only do we confront our internalized trauma while witnessing the oppressive realities of our world, we also resist the tendency to reduce youth experiences into pure statistics, devoid of socio-political meaning. We know that if we die at the hands of police, justice will not be served within the “ justice ” system and will be left as a number to the added list of Black and brown bodies whose blood is stained in our streets at the root of America’s issue: racism. We should not have to experience the moments that are supposed to be the cornerstone of our lives in fear and uncertainty.
However, we conjured our power to disrupt the day-to-day uncertainties, disadvantages and injustices. We as youth have blossomed into an impalpable force to where youth advocates like Nahjah and Nashon Wilson in Stafford, VA; the four women who built the Teens4Equality organization in Nashville, TN; Mical Juliet, Franki Phoenix, Zauvier Fenceroy and myself in Austin, Texas continue to push for public and social policy reform, collaborative change and economic justice. With our efforts being recognized it is imperative that we continue to prepare youth for what is to come. As U.S Senator Cory Booker said, “ You don’t have to be one of those people that accepts things as they are. Every day, take responsibility for changing them right where you are.”

Below are five tips for youth I have created from my experience as a Youth Advocate and Student Leader in the City of Austin to begin their journey into advocacy, community activism and social entrepreneurship.

You are your Number One Priority
If you do not take care of yourself how can you serve others at the best capacity you can. Self care is about self-reflection and it’s a journey. Learning and establishing a self care routine does not happen overnight, it takes time. You may be thinking, what does self care mean? Well, self care is ambiguous. Self care means knowing who you are and understanding
your limits; developing a good sleeping pattern and eating habits; constructing ways to decompress and realign your mind, spirit and energy; taking time to know yourself, your goals and how you want to manifest the change-maker you want to be; identifying what you love and hate or what motivates and discourages you. Self care can be simply defined as self love,
but on that journey to that you first must identify your “why” and thrive.

Find Your “Why” and Your Vision
To find your “why” and your vision you must: identify your core values;
discover who inspires you, who motivates you to be the catalyst of change in your community; and understand that your vision takes time to develop and grow. It will change, shift and possibly renew itself over time. With developing your “why” and vision you cannot put your hands in multiple pots, overwhelming and stressing yourself. Take your time and volunteer with local organizations,reach out to community members whose interests align with yours and ask questions or do a journey of self-discovery and read books, articles or blogs to gain knowledge on your interests and whichever topic you feel touches your soul start pursuing it. However, with this journey you must understand not everyone will agree with your stance nor stand with you when you need support.

Be Aware of Who Is For You and Against You
In the world of advocacy and on your way to achieving justice and change you will have your allies and opposes. Not everyone will agree with your values, ideas or your right to have a seat at the table. You must be prepared for that realization and “no” to your cause. However, this should never discourage you. Utilize your colleagues, close peers, past and current employers, teachers or anyone who is interested in investing in you and form a community. Once you have a community backing you up, you will be unstoppable. If you are not given a seat at the table build your own table and create the change you want to see. Your existence does not need validation, you are a force and a resistance.

Time Management
Do not overwhelm, stress or burden yourself trying to take advantage of every opportunity and the issues damaging your communities. Establish a foundation for your brand and the issues you want to solve in your community as well as using your local community members and organizations to further your goals. When you use time managing tools like Trello, Asana, Google Calendar or even the Reminders app on your phone you can then begin implementing strategies to your success on how much time you are allocating for the issues you want to solve and the commitments you are going to take on.

You Are NEVER Alone
You are never alone. Whatever country, state, city or town you reside in there are organizations and individuals who will support, uplift and cherish the work you do. Remember it doesn’t matter what platform you use, it’s about the work you produce and the presence you create when you walk into a room. You will never be alone, we are here always.

I urge you to utilize these tips and start generating the momentum you want to see your community taking in approaching and addressing structures of ageism, racism, xenophobia or any sign of inequity. Start now.
Author a call-to-action plan. Engage with your communities. Mobilize and create change.

In Solidarity Say & Remember Their Names
Brad Levi Ayala | Cameron Tillman | Carey Smith-Viramontes | Diana Showman | Dillon McGee | Emantic “EJ” Fitzgerald Bradford Jr | Elijah Tufono | Jeffrey Holden | Joshua Dariandre Ruffin |Justin Howell | Laquan McDonald | Levi Weaver | Roshad McIntosh | Sarah Grossman | Sean Monterrosa | Tamir Rice | VonDerrit Myers Jr. | Zauvier Feneceroy

How to Create a Remote Workspace

By Marissa Greene

Seven tips from an Academic Coach to get you through this semester

COVID-19 has changed the way we work, grocery shop, learn, and overall living. In a time of social distancing, students need to work on their education behind a screen rather than a classroom setting. For some, this may be a piece of cake, but for many others, this could feel frustrating, stressful, and even discouraging at times. ACCENT sat down with Austin Community College Academic Coach, Thomas Blain, to get some insight on how students can successfully adjust during this Pandemic. 

Set Up a Consistent Location.
Look around your place and try to find the best work from home space. Whether that is working at a desk, a space in your room, or a counter in your home, this should be the place you can feel most productive in. If you live with family or roommates try to find a place that is the least distracting from others. If you have children at home, depending on their age, this may be something to coordinate with them or others in the home. Children could be working at the dining table while you are in the living room or vice versa.

Sitting While Working.
Who knew something as small as your position could play such a big role in your school performance? Although it may be tempting to lay on the couch or in your bed while doing school work, it may not be the most productive. ACC academic coach, Thomas Blain, recommends sitting upright while doing classwork.

“If I was to lie down while I was I work, I think I’d fall asleep,” Blain said

Sitting upright can help concentration while keeping you in the balance between feeling too cozy and too uncomfortable.

Confining Your Space.
Look at your workspace and what do you see? Are there papers filled with notes all over the place? Do you have pens, pencils, and your calculator scattered around you? If so, this tip is for you. Take a step back from where you are working and look at it. Is there a way you can confine or organize this space? The answer is yes! By keeping your place tidy you will be able to find your school work/supplies much easier and save you the time you would be looking for that one notes page you need and more time on using it. If you ever have seen the movie “Ratatouille” think of what Colette said to Remy in the kitchen “Keep your station clear!” 

Visual Reminders.
As we get closer and closer to semester final exams, you may be feeling overwhelmed and/or unprepared. A helpful way to keep yourself ahead of the game is to create visual reminders of important dates or when specific classwork is due such as quizzes, tests, and exams. These visual reminders could be physical, digital, or a mixture of both.

“When I am at my desk I have a semester calendar in the back which just has some important dates,” Blain said.

By being prepared for summer registration, FAFSA applications, and final exams, you start to feel more in control of your academics. Reminders such as sticky notes, Google Calendar notifications, or even looking at your ACC Planner every day can help better plan for what’s to come and more importantly be prepared.

Blocking the Noise.
Whether your distractions are the noises from your family members, your roommates who are also working from home, or the elephants that just moved in the apartment above you, find a way to minimize distracting noise. One way Blain recommends is by listening to music or something that can cancel out whatever noise is distracting you.

“I like listening to KUT sometimes because that is not as distracting for me,” Blain said.

However, if you find yourself spending more time belting your heart out to “Material Girl” by Madonna or “The Anthem” by Good Charlotte rather than memorizing all the organelles in a cell earplugs may be better for you. Blain recommends purchasing some earplugs at your local grocery store if possible to help those who work better in a space free from all noises. 

Removing the Distractions You Can Control.
It’s okay to admit that scrolling through your Instagram feed is more interesting than the 20 pages of book reading you have to do, but which one is more important? Removing distractions such as your phone from your workspace can help improve your productivity. This could be physically placing your phone across the room, turning it off, or even just flipping it face down. If the distractions are on your computer, Blain recommends removing tabs or browsers from your computer while working. This could look like opening two different windows on your device and dedicating one to work and the other to your personal interests. 

Sticking to a Routine.
Whether it was the routine you had at the beginning of the semester or one that better fits your lifestyle now, finding a routine and sticking to it is a major factor in your academics.

“Once you get a routine it kind of helps you with the procrastination piece,” Blain said.

Routines can help create order and discipline in your learning environment. Your daily routine can look very different compared to your classmate but it is so important to find something that works for you. A method that Blain discusses is the 45/15 minute studying rule. With this method, you would ideally study for 45 minutes and give yourself a 15-minute break in-between.

“If you do hour upon hour of work you are going to get burnt out,” Blain said.

Taking breaks can be equally important as the time you are dedicating to work. This allows you to feel refreshed and recharge. During your breaks find ways to disconnect from your studies. This could be scrolling through TikTok, going for a walk, or even taking a moment to make something to eat.

“Be realistic about what your habits are and give yourself that time to relax,” Blain said. 

Don’t feel that you have a working space?

It is important to understand that this can be a stressful time for a multitude of reasons. If you are feeling discouraged about creating an effective workspace form home Blain suggests the idea of having a conversation with whoever you are living with about the importance of your studies. 

“Have a diplomatic conversation with whoever you are living with,” Blain said. 

Although it may not look like you are still taking classes to whomever you are living with, a conversation may help address any distractions you face while trying to study and work towards a solution.

https://youtu.be/F1bgjmz375g

A Salute to the Veterans Resource Center

The Place for Students Who Served

Story by: Jace Puckett

Veteran students are able to receive academic, financial, and personal assistance while enrolled at Austin Community College through a resource known as The Veterans Resource Center located at Highland Campus. 

Located in building 4000, the first thing a student will see when they walk in the center is the open lounge area for a place to engage with other Riverbats. 

“The Veterans Resource Center is a place for veteran students to connect with each other and with our VA [Veterans Affairs] staff,” said Bethann Warwick, the veterans outreach coordinator for all ACC campuses. 

“We want a safe place where students can come and study and just be who they are,” said Warwick. 

In addition to the lounge, this 4,000 square-foot-center also has rooms that can be utilized as a quiet place to study, Warwick explained. 

“We have space for students to study in a quiet conference room with desks and comfortable chairs, and we also have computer stations where individuals can do their homework or print out things they need for free.”

Veteran students who are planning on transferring to other colleges or universities can receive help from the center as well. 

“Every spring, we host a veteran transfer fair. What makes it different from the other transfer fairs is that we actually invite the VA person from other campuses and the veterans can come and meet that VA person and the recruiting officer from the institution they want to transfer to so they can find out exactly how they need to transfer their benefits over to make it a lot smoother when they transfer over.”

 Other resources the center offers include help with writing applications for colleges and universities, as well as writing resumes. Even students who are looking for textbooks or a little cash are also in luck at the center. 

“If students need assistance in finding books, or if they need a little gas money until their next paycheck, I can reach out to the community and find those services for them.”

The center even has resources for students who need counseling with their personal lives.

 “Our VITAL (Veterans Integration to Academic Leadership) coordinator, Jeff Mo, does counseling here at the center. He can do counseling with students to discuss stressors that they have day to day in their classrooms and their personal lives as well. He meets here on Wednesdays from 8:30 AM to 5 PM, and he can be seen by appointment.”

The environment at the center is warm and welcoming, according to Warwick. 

“There’s always laughter and students are always hanging out. Sometimes they bring food for each other or they help each other with certain situations.”

Laura Maldonado, a student veteran who served in the Marines, talked about how she enjoys connecting with other veterans as well as the VA staff.

 “I like how approachable everyone is. Everybody’s eager to help.” 

Army veteran Raymond Cathey mentioned how useful the center has been for veteran students like him. 

“For veterans who don’t know, there are counselors in the back who tell them about the benefits that they qualify for. One example is the Dependent Education Assistance program. If a veteran has a certain disability, they’ll get a stipend to go to school.”

 Learn more on how to get connected by visiting one of the Veteran Affairs offices located in the Highland, Northridge, Riverside, and Round Rock campuses. Or they can visit the Veterans Resource Center located in building 4000 of the Highland Campus.

ACC Encourages Students to Utilize Resources to Combat Food Insecurity

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The ACC community sheds light on the silent issue of food insecurity amongst its students.

Story and video by:  Marissa Greene

How can a house stand tall when it is built on sand? Similarly, how can a student achieve success when lacking the physiological needs such as food, shelter, and sleep? According to the Hope Center for College, Community, and Justice, 48% of the 86 thousand community college students who responded to the center’s survey face food insecurity. 

For 22 year old ACC student, Damienn Alcala, this is more than just a statistic; it’s a reality. Making the choice between paying for books, tuition, and transportation, housing can often appear more vital for students than a month’s  worth of groceries.

“College is so expensive, and it’s an investment,” Alcala said. “With the average college debt being so high, where does that leave money for students to buy their own groceries?” 

The U.S. Department of Agriculture defines food insecurity as a lack of consistent access to enough food for an active and healthy life. When a student is food insecure, a number of other challenges can also cause an impact on their life. 

“When students are food insecure it’s like a ripple effect. If you’re hungry then how can you study?” says Student Life Coordinator, Jennifer Flowers. “It also has an effect on graduation rate too. So if you are missing that basic need and cannot go to class, then how can you graduate?” Flowers says.  

Students are able to utilize the food pantries in the student life lounge of every campus. The food pantries provide students with canned goods and other non-perishable items without a dollar sign associated with it.

The food pantry’s purpose is to help students during times of immediate hunger in order to better themselves when on campus. As an additional resource, student life partners up with Central Texas Food Bank on the fourth Friday of every month from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the Riverside campus to supply groceries to students. On that day, students are able to walk into the student life lounge at the Riverside Campus and receive a ticket. That ticket will tell them when to come out into the parking lot, where they are greeted by volunteers, reusable bags, and a line of tables with an abundance of food choices. 

As the student walks through the line,  they receive two reusable bags for their items and can pick anywhere from chicken, canned goods, fresh produce, and even bread. After their selections, these students are able to receive assistance carrying these groceries back to their car or the bus stop.

Earlier this year, Sara Goldrick-Rab, the founder of the Hope Center for College Community and Justice spoke with ACC staff and faculty about how obstacles like food insecurity plays a role within the college. According to their most recent survey, 42% of students just at ACC alone are food insecure. Which comes at second place following home insecurity, which is nearly over 50% of Riverbats. 

“We don’t do things unless we are personally affected by them,” Goldrick-Rab says. “Having a student program that students don’t know about doesn’t make it effective” 

Alcala believes that in order to get more students involved, both students and faculty must first get the conversation started about food insecurity. During the first week of each semester, Student Life organizes a welcome week where students can orient themselves within Student Life and become more aware of the resources available to them.

“When talking to students even more, when they use the food pantry, when we wheel in the carts of food at the food distribution, the students are thankful that they don’t have to worry about groceries for that month,” Flowers said. 

 With all that the food pantry and distribution has to offer, Flowers recognizes how having these conversations with each other also creates a bond between students in the community.

“This is when conversations start to open up about their own struggles,” Flowers said. “Every single staff member in our department is all about student success.”

 Flowers hopes that talking about food insecurity encourages all departments to want to get to know their students more beyond the ACCeID. 

For students like Alcala, they don’t let the statistics get in the way of striving for not only a better education, but also for the betterment of the ACC community.

“For someone who is like me, just know that it’s okay, that is why we are here at ACC,” Alcala said. “To come together and say, ‘Hey, we may not have that much money, but we have each other to help out.’ That’s what I feel is the real message of ACC.”

If you are someone you know could benefit from the Student Life food pantry or monthly food distribution, visit your campus’ Student Life lounge to learn more, or visit austincc.edu/slfoodpantry@austincc.edu

 

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Student Mentors – The Riverbat Ambassadors

Story by: Ruben Hernandez

Each ACC campus has its very own Student Life lounge. Students are more than welcome to come in, relax, and chill in between classes or get ready for that big test they’re about to take. There are many resources that can be taken advantage of provided by Student Life within these lounges. One resource in particular is the presence of the Riverbat Ambassadors.

“A Riverbat Ambassador is a mentor to students,” Round Rock Riverbat Ambassador Ashley Vasquez said. “They help plan events, or help students in need when they come in with questions. RA’s are also required to do 2 ‘Real Talks’ a semester. The purpose of a Real Talk is to create a intimate environment for students to feel comfortable, open up, and ask questions.”

Ambassadors carry knowledge about campus events and are able to travel campuses to table and fulfill a variety of duties. Not only that, if you don’t feel comfortable about where you are on campus, they can help you with that.

“We serve as a source of information and support for students,” Vasquez said. “You can tell some students don’t feel comfortable enough to ask certain questions or even come in. Part of your job is to notice that and be able to approach certain people when you can or help when they seem lost. It’s a big role.”

First-year college students tend to be shy about what they’re doing or when looking for new friends. Ambassadors are there to give them that little bit of confidence.

“We can also be a person for someone to talk to,” Vasquez said. “That’s why being able to read a student’s body language and how they approach can be important. Sometimes you can tell that they need someone to talk to and you can try to go off of that. If they continually come in but don’t talk or make eye contact, just ask how they are or if they need anything. Give them consistency to ensure that they feel welcome enough to come back.”

Vasquez says since she’s fairly new to being on campus physically since she took online courses last semester. So, she has been in the same boat as many students are now about having a comfortable space to be in.

“I know what it’s like to feel so lost as a student,” Vasquez said. “I’ve been in those shoes, and I feel like that’s what drew me in. It’s weird to have a place without support. I thought this would be a great role for me because I want to help support other students in their success. It feels nice to let them know that everything is going to be okay. We’re going to struggle, but we’re all in it together.”

Becoming a Riverbat Ambassador isn’t something too difficult either.

“Anybody can be a Riverbat Ambassador so long as they are receiving financial aid,” Vasquez said. “You apply through financial aid, and if you get approved you can apply. You have the option to be either a Campus or Riverbat Ambassador.”
Maintaining a light atmosphere in the Student Life room is also something that is of importance. It’s a place to relax, so it is necessary to make it feel as such.

“It’s important to keep a cool atmosphere in the Student Life room because some students just need a break,” Vasquez said. “Some people are so used to being either in a classroom or studying somewhere. It would be nice to have a place to get out of your head. People come in, they chat, they play games or whatever makes them comfortable.”

While the Student Life lounge is meant to be a space for students to relax, it is also headquarters for many workshops and informational events. All you have to do is keep yourself updated.

“There are a lot of connections students can make through student life,” Vasquez said. “Even just attending a Success Series or certain events, or talking to advisors and counselors who come in is beneficial. There are so many resources to help you through, and there are many avenues that will help you get to where you’re going. It’ll help you along your path and maybe even give you an idea of where you want to go.”

Campus Org Profile: Phi Theta Kappa

Story by Shannon Mullery, Reporter

At the beginning of each semester, college students receive invitaions via mail, e-mail and word of mouth to join a multitude of clubs, groups and fraternities or sororities. One that students at ACC receive is a little yellow invitation in the mail for a group called Phi Theta Kappa.

While some students, understandably, have the impression that this organization is a fraternity or sorority, it is actually an honors society that extends to community colleges everywhere in the United States, as well as internationally.

“I like to say we’re more geek than Greek,” Daniel Chitty, ACC’s Alpha Gamma Pi Chapter Presi- dent said. “But I’m not gonna say it’s not at all social, because we do like to have a good time.”

Each chapter of Phi Theta Kappa is very unique. At ACC, the Alpha Gamma Pi chapter focuses on community service, academics, and some research activity. Students with 12-23 hours and a 3.5 GPA, 24-45 hours and a 3.4 GPA, or over 46 hours and a 3.25 GPA all qualify to apply for membership.

Students also need to be enrolled in at least six credit hours the semester they join, and have a declared major. Bronze members only need to attend a new member orientation meeting, and pay the membership meetings. Silver members can expect some active involvement, and gold members should expect to devote a fair amount of their time to the organization.

Shortly after joining Phi Theta Kappa in the fall of 2011, Chitty volunteered to fill in for a campus vice president, who had stepped down in the organization. He moved up quickly, becoming Phi Theta Kappa’s international president in Apr. of 2013.

“Campaigning for the office and holding the office are two very different experiences. Win or lose, you always grow from the campaign experience,” Chitty said. Joining Phi Theta Kappa has not changed his long-term goals, which include getting accepted into dental school, but it has helped him broaden his perspective.

“I feel like it has helped to prepare me much better than any classroom could to enter into a much more professional realm.” Chitty will be attending the School of Dentistry at the UT Health and Science Center in San Antonio next year.

Boards Members Settle In

Chloe Kwak, Reporter

New ACC board of trustees members Mark Williams and Gigi Edwards Bryant have had several months to settle into their new roles.

“It’s an exciting time to be in the community college world,” Williams, a University of Texas graduate, said.

Gigi Edwards Bryant is a sixth generation Austinite.

“I am most excited about the fact that we all have a shared mission for the college, students, staff and education. Everyone has great passion,” Bryant said.

Williams was elected to Place 1 in the Novemeber 2014 elections, and Bryant was elected to Place 2 in a runoff election in December 2014 elections.

Both trustees’ terms end in 2020.

 

TIPA 2015

Six members of Accent’s student staff attended the 2015 Texas Intercollegiate Press Association conference April 9-11 in San Antonio.
Congratulations to Accent Editor in Chief Noor Alahmadi who was elected Secretary of the 2016 TIPA student executive committee.
Congratulations to the following Accent students for being recognized in five categories including two First Place awards:
  • First Place Critical Review – Joseph Van Vranken, Multimedia Editor
  • First Place Picture Story – Dave Creaney, Photographer and Preston Bezant, Layout/Design Editor
  • Honorable Mention News story – Manal El-Haj, Reporter
  • Honorable Mention Feature Page Design – Preston Bezant, Layout/Design Editor
  • Honorable Mention Illustration (Non-photo) – Daniel Groh, contributor
TIPA was established in 1909 at Baylor University and is the oldest collegiate press association in the nation.
This year 442 students and 76 advisers attended the convention from 62 member colleges and universities. The convention hosted journalism contests ranging from TV News Broadcasting to Newspaper Headline Writing. Professional journalists and journalism professors held workshops on networking, resume writing, and various aspects of journalism.
“The contests were very competitive and drove me to put my best foot forward,” Ryan Fontenette-Mitchell, Accent reporter and business clerk said. “The workshops were detail oriented and gave me a lot of information that I can apply in my career.”

Accent Staff
Accent’s spring 2015 staff members complete registration at their first Texas Intercollegiate Press Association conference April 9 at the El Tropicano Riverwalk Hotel in San Antonio. This was the time attending the convention for (left to right) Ryan Fontenette-Mitchell, Chloe Kwak, Noor Alahmadi, Gaius Straka, Joseph Lee and Shannon Mullery.

“Y.O.Unique” Event: ACC Round Rock Campus

Press release by Kassandra Burns

ROUND ROCK CAMPUS April 7, 2015 — The Student Life Campus Team will host “Y.O.Unique” on April 7 from 11 a.m. – 2 p.m. in building 2000 on the Round Rock Campus.

The event is  open to all ACC students. Cupcakes and prizes will be served to participants who complete the True Colors personality quiz.

The quiz is designed to show participants which color/personality traits are dominant and enhance interpersonal communication in both professional and personal settings.

In addition to completing the quiz, students may speak with campus advisors about career choices that may better suit their personalities. At one of the event stations, participants will be able to look up famous people who share their True Color results.

The theory of True Colors originated around 460 b.c. when four different temperaments were identified involving Plato’s ideas about character and personality.

For more information about the event, email Claudia at Claudia.garcia2@g.austincc.edu