ACC Student Life Hosts Virtual Enneagram Workshop Series for Students

Written By: Marissa Greene

How familiar does this scenario sound to you? One day while bored on the internet you decide to do what most people do when bored on the internet — you take a personality quiz. Whether it be just for the fun of it or for personal development, after a quick google search, you have thousands upon thousands of options to choose from. Whether that be the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator assessment, the Sixteen Personality Factor Questionnaire, or perhaps you simply want to find out if you would be a Hufflepuff or Gryffindor while as student at Hogwarts, a personality test might have shaped you in one way or another.

Despite whatever preconceptions you may have about personality tests, there may be one that you might want to know more about, and that is the Enneagram of Types. 

“The Enneagram of Personality Types is a modern synthesis of a number of ancient wisdom traditions, but the person who originally put the system together was Oscar Ichazo.” According to The Enneagram Institute. 

Ichazo was searching for a systematic approach to applying all of his teachings on “psychology, cosmology, metaphysics, spirituality, and so forth, combined with various practices to bring about transformations of human consciousness,” (The Enneagram Institute). He, and a group of psychologists and writers, Claudio Naranjo and John Lilly, visited Arica, Chile in the late 1960s and early 70s to study Ichazo’s findings and most notably, the Enneagram symbol. 

Although the Enneagram Symbol has ancient roots in Greek philosophy, the symbol was “reintroduced to the modern world by George Gurdjieff, the founder of a highly influential inner work school,” according to The Enneagram Institute. Which is what many of us may be familiar with today. 

The Enneagram of Personality Types is a set of nine numbers that represent nine basic personality types. 

  • One: The Reformer
  • Two: The Helper
  • Three: The Achiever
  • Four: The Individualist
  • Five: The Investigator
  • Six: The Loyalist
  • Seven: The Enthusiast
  • Eight: The Challenger
  • Nine: The Peacemaker

Although these numbers give some foundation to the lengthy process of fully understanding the enneagram system, these numbers don’t solely identify the individual. As a matter of fact, everyone will resonate with each of the numbers to a certain degree. 

However, unlike other personality typing systems, The Enneagram of Personality Types functions differently because there is no “official” enneagram test. 

“Technically, we really are not supposed to take a test to identify our number. It’s one of the reasons why I don’t push a test or workshop” said Lauren Christian, a Student Life Coordinator at Austin Community College. 

For the Fall 2020 semester, Christian has been hosting a virtual enneagram workshop series with ACC Student Life that breaks down the nine basic personality types into three triads: the gut, the heart, and the head. These events are dedicated to helping students better understand The Enneagram of Personality Types and discover their conscious or subconscious motivations.

“Two different people can have similar actions for very different reasons and very different thought patterns behind them. So the enneagram is a personality typing system that looks at the motivations that a person has learned through their life,” said Christian. 

Through this enneagram workshop series, students will be able to learn not only more about their motivations but also get a better understanding of those around them and how to communicate with them. Not only that but also how to utilize information from the enneagram workshop to identify better ways to be productive. 

Through Christian’s own personal experience learning about her enneagram number, she shares how she applies this concept to combat situations where she feels the least productive. 

“One of the common things about the nine’s is that momentum is one of the biggest things. So if you slow down, it takes a lot of energy to get back out of it. If you get going, you can keep going,” said Christian.

Christian also states that because she has learned more about the enneagram system, she is able to make personal reminders to keep her momentum going or even communicate her needs to others when in need of help. 

“It can help you better understand ‘Why am I slowing down?” or “Why am I speeding up?” That can be applied to school work, relationships, and things like that,” said Christian. 

There are two workshops left for the remainder of the semester. On Oct.19 the workshop will cover enneagram numbers two, three, and four that make up the heart triad. On Nov. 9 the event will wrap up the series with enneagram numbers five, six, and seven, also known as the head triad. Students are encouraged to participate in all the workshops no matter how much background knowledge one has about this concept. 

“Come with any questions you may have and be ready to look at yourself and your motivations,” said Christian. 

For more information on the Enneagram Workshop Series or to RSVP, visit the MYSL Website.  

A Salute to the Veterans Resource Center

The Place for Students Who Served

Story by: Jace Puckett

Veteran students are able to receive academic, financial, and personal assistance while enrolled at Austin Community College through a resource known as The Veterans Resource Center located at Highland Campus. 

Located in building 4000, the first thing a student will see when they walk in the center is the open lounge area for a place to engage with other Riverbats. 

“The Veterans Resource Center is a place for veteran students to connect with each other and with our VA [Veterans Affairs] staff,” said Bethann Warwick, the veterans outreach coordinator for all ACC campuses. 

“We want a safe place where students can come and study and just be who they are,” said Warwick. 

In addition to the lounge, this 4,000 square-foot-center also has rooms that can be utilized as a quiet place to study, Warwick explained. 

“We have space for students to study in a quiet conference room with desks and comfortable chairs, and we also have computer stations where individuals can do their homework or print out things they need for free.”

Veteran students who are planning on transferring to other colleges or universities can receive help from the center as well. 

“Every spring, we host a veteran transfer fair. What makes it different from the other transfer fairs is that we actually invite the VA person from other campuses and the veterans can come and meet that VA person and the recruiting officer from the institution they want to transfer to so they can find out exactly how they need to transfer their benefits over to make it a lot smoother when they transfer over.”

 Other resources the center offers include help with writing applications for colleges and universities, as well as writing resumes. Even students who are looking for textbooks or a little cash are also in luck at the center. 

“If students need assistance in finding books, or if they need a little gas money until their next paycheck, I can reach out to the community and find those services for them.”

The center even has resources for students who need counseling with their personal lives.

 “Our VITAL (Veterans Integration to Academic Leadership) coordinator, Jeff Mo, does counseling here at the center. He can do counseling with students to discuss stressors that they have day to day in their classrooms and their personal lives as well. He meets here on Wednesdays from 8:30 AM to 5 PM, and he can be seen by appointment.”

The environment at the center is warm and welcoming, according to Warwick. 

“There’s always laughter and students are always hanging out. Sometimes they bring food for each other or they help each other with certain situations.”

Laura Maldonado, a student veteran who served in the Marines, talked about how she enjoys connecting with other veterans as well as the VA staff.

 “I like how approachable everyone is. Everybody’s eager to help.” 

Army veteran Raymond Cathey mentioned how useful the center has been for veteran students like him. 

“For veterans who don’t know, there are counselors in the back who tell them about the benefits that they qualify for. One example is the Dependent Education Assistance program. If a veteran has a certain disability, they’ll get a stipend to go to school.”

 Learn more on how to get connected by visiting one of the Veteran Affairs offices located in the Highland, Northridge, Riverside, and Round Rock campuses. Or they can visit the Veterans Resource Center located in building 4000 of the Highland Campus.

Surviving Sickness

Tips and Hacks on How You and Your Family can Use to Help Prevent Getting Sick this Year

Story by: Nalani Nuylan

So it’s that time of year again. Sure we love Halloween candy and the pumpkin spice lattes, but we can confidently say we hate cold/flu/allergy season. It’s never fun: the runny nose, sore throat, fevers, and in worst-case scenarios, the vomiting. So how can we stay safe from evil bacteria and viruses? Here are some helpful life hacks and tips you can use to prevent getting sick. 

Know the warning signs:
Before we go and find remedies to cure us, we first need to know what exactly you are fighting. According to the National Institutes of Health colds, flu and allergies affect your respiratory system, making it harder to breathe. However, each has its own symptoms to look out for:

  • Flu: look for fatigue, aches and pains and a high fever that lasts for several days.
  • Colds: sore throats, runny nose and cough, but no fever.
  • Allergies: your eyes will become itchy and watery. Please note that allergies are different because your body is reacting to a trigger rather than fighting a virus.

 

Wash your hands: 
Now that we know what you look for, washing your hands is one of the first things you need to bo. This small act does wonders. If you wash your hands for 20 seconds or more with warm water and soap, the amount of damage to your health will notably decrease. Just sign the ABCs with warm water when washing then you’re done, that’s all you need to do. 

 

Clean, Clean, Clean:
It goes without saying but in addition to the time you spend time washing your hands, you should also spend time cleaning the surfaces your hands touch. Disinfecting doorknobs, refrigerator handles, keyboards, steering wheel and your phone regularly can go a long way. Leaving you and your loved ones free from another day of catching a cold. 

 

Cover your cough and sneeze: 
This is a pet peeve to most, especially yours truly. Cough and sneeze into a tissue and then throw it away, or cough and sneeze into your upper shirt sleeve, completely covering your mouth and nose. For extra protection, sneeze and cough away from other people and food, preferably the ground with your back towards the crowd. BBC’s Science Focus Magazine estimates your sneeze alone travels 25 feet away from your runny nose. That is a lot of surface area and a lot of people to infect. We don’t want what you have, so keep it to yourself. 

 

Get some Zzz’s:
Fun fact whenever your body sleeps, it heals itself. The same can be said for when you’re sick. Sleep and let your body use the valuable energy you would use for walking to fight the bacteria instead.

   

Load up on fluids: 
The more you pee, the better you’ll be. Jokes aside, according to WebMD.com, liquids keep your respiratory system hydrated and filters out the viruses out of your body. Water is good, but all liquids help in this case: orange juice, chicken broth, hot tea with honey, to name a few. 

 

Exercise:
Even though rest is important, breaking a sweat can strengthen your immune system. According to Health.com, a low impact/low energy exercise routine such as walking or yoga, “[takes] 25% to 50% less time off from work during cold and flu season compared with couch potatoes.” Meaning if you want to be sick for only two days instead of four, go outside and take a walk. 

 

Take a steamy shower:
The steam from the shower can help with congestion and cough. The shower opens up our pores in your skin, enabling you to breathe better. When it comes to your health, there is no such thing as too many washes. Plus, studies conducted at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York have shown that viruses survive better in dry air rather than humid/steamy air. 

 

Eat the Super Soup:
There is a reason that Chicken soup is what your mom gave you whenever you were sick. Not only is it comfort food, but it provides your body the nutrition it needs. The warm broth will not only keep you hydrated but also soothe your sore throat. The carrots, onion, and celery are rich in vitamins A and C. The chicken and noodles provide a source of protein and carbs to keep you full. 

  

Of course, these are just hacks you can do at home to help yourself out. If you need antibiotics or medication, please go to your doctor for help. If your doctor recommends getting a flu shot, CVS and Walgreens offers them for free. If you want to learn more hacks check out Leander ISD’s recommendations, National Health Institutes warning signs, WebMD.com’s tips, and Health.com’s gallery.       

Student Government Association takes on Washington DC

Photo Story by: Nikoo Vafaee

Hello Washington DC! The E-board members from ACC’s Student Government Association recently took a trip to Washington DC to attend the American Student Government Association conference. The conference was located in their hotel which included daily workshops on how to better their leadership, make connections, and more! After all the training they then got to explore many historical sites. Come along and see some photos of Washington DC!

ACC Highland Point of Light for Take Back The Night

Written By Ruben Hernandez
Video By Nathaniel Torres

Austin Community College hosted its first ever Take Back the Night event, focused on the support of those who have undergone sexual assault or domestic violence. The event not only offered a variety of resources, but also a march through the main Highland Campus building and a speak out, where survivors were able to share their stories.

“Take Back the Night is a great event for students to get in contact with faculty, staff, and the community,“ Compliance Investigator Austin Wood said.
“It gives a platform for individuals to express themselves and share their stories. It’s also an opportunity to meet advocates and allies, connected with a population of support and passion. It’s a night of celebration and really making it through the hard and tough times.”

Take Back the Night maintained a high emphasis on the aspect of bonds and community, stating several times that those who have undergone assault or abuse aren’t alone. There are resources and people to help.
“It’s not something that anyone should have to deal with by themselves if they do feel that way,” Wood said. “It’s a really difficult thing that individuals have to go through, such trauma and such harm. But to know that there are resources such as this event and a community within the college itself, it really provides an outlet to know that they are not alone.”

Most notably during the Speak Out session, survivors were able to share their stories
and explain how far they have come since being abused or assaulted. Whoever wanted to share their story was welcome to walk up to the mic and start.
“The Speak Out began with an awesome keynote speaker,” Social and Civic Awareness and Student Life Coordinator Carrie Cooper said. “She shared her story about her leaving an abusive relationship while starting here at ACC. I think that was encouraging to other students and faculty staff members to come share their stories.”

Media has definitely played a part in spreading the message, but hearing it first-hand seems to have a different effect.
“It’s one thing to see statistics and news stories, but it’s another thing to hear someone’s actual story,” Cooper said. “It helps you put a person to the issue and realize why it’s so important for all of us to stand up against sexual and domestic violence. When you actually hear people’s stories, it spurs you on like nothing else will.”

ACC is one of the many campuses in the nation that holds a Take Back the Night event, but it is one of 10 campuses that will be featured by the Take Back the Night Foundation.
“The 10 Points of Light are 10 different campuses and locations that will be featured by the National Take Back the Night Foundation on April 25,” Cooper said. “I lead the TBTN planning committee, and after I applied, the national foundation reached out to me and asked if ACC would be interested in being featured.”

Victims of sexual assault or domestic violence can be anyone of any gender, skin color, race, or sexual identity. People are different, but the stories can be similar.
“What I learned from Take Back the Night is that everyone is different,” Riverbat Ambassador Jesse Fraga said. “These people were here sharing their stories, and expressing how they feel.”

Providing opportunities for victims is something that is widely emphasized, and resources such as counselors and the SAFE Alliance were there at Take Back the Night to emphasize that.
“What stuck out to me the most was how powerful it is to hear from other people who have been where you are,” Cooper said. “I think it is encouraging in a way that nothing else is encouraging. It’s good for students to be able to hear other peoples’ stories, and realize that they’re not alone and there’s nothing wrong with them.”

Fraga believes that support and encouragement are key to handling these types of situations.
“If that one person tells a friend about their situation, that friend needs to encourage that person to speak up,” Fraga said. “It’s really severe. That’s what Take Back the Night is about: how severe it can get and the support for those people. If you’re someone that has had a friend tell you about their tragedy, it’s our job to convince them to speak up or have them talk to a counselor because this can get very bad.”

With the recent #MeToo movement, sexual assault and domestic violence have become a more significant and serious topic. This was one of the things that started the effort to a better and more well-aware society.
“It’s a really hard and sometimes awkward thing to talk about,” Cooper said. “Obviously our culture has changed with the #MeToo movement. It still takes a lot to talk in front of a group of people in real life, which is a lot different than making a social media post. That still takes courage, but being present with people can make it healing in a way because you can see people who you see your own story in.”

People of all sorts of backgrounds have free access to these resources. No matter where you’re from or who you are, support is available for anyone in need of it.
“I think its a huge resource and shows that the college shows an emphasis on support,” Wood said. ”Everybody has a background and everyone goes through life experiences, and it’s important to know that there’s a place and an outlet for all individuals of diverse backgrounds. We all have different experiences and come from different places in life.”

The bond between community and victim is something that can make the world of a difference, and Take Back the Night was to serve as the connection between the two.
“I hear stories about how bad it can get without speaking up,” Fraga said. “I think that what the most important thing is: speak up no matter what. Whether you’re the friend or the victim, as a community we need to speak up louder and louder.”

Campus Closeup: ACC District: Past, Present and Beyond

Story by Carizma Barrera, Campus Editor
Michael Sismilich, Audio Editor contributed to the reporting of this article,
Photos by Keri Gabriele, Photo Editor

Continue reading “Campus Closeup: ACC District: Past, Present and Beyond”